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Majority of people attempting to lose weight turn to fad diets which are not sustainable for long term weight loss, Cenegenics helps patients understand “Why Am I Gaining Weight” and how to lose it

Why Am I Gaining Weight: Psychology of Weight Loss

Article at a Glance

  • Fad diets are often the first mistake encountered by individuals attempting to lose weight. Fad diets can cause major nutritional gaps and be extremely restrictive, which may cause individuals to gain all or more of the weight back upon stopping the diet.
  • Stress, increased cortisol levels, increased ghrelin, and outside influences can contribute to weight gain.
  • Outside influences from TV shows, movies, magazines or the people around you can affect your motivation for physical activity, eating patterns, goal orientation, and self-efficiency.

Losing weight is one of the most commonly sought-after goals in our society. Oftentimes, when we think of improving health, the first thing that comes to mind is weight loss. Research shows that roughly half of Americans are trying to lose weight, with the majority of this group employing dietary changes as a means of doing so [1].

Yet, when they are first confronted with the puzzle of how to lose weight, most people don’t step back and analyze their approach to eating as a whole. Instead, they explore which fad diets promise the best results – whether that’s the quickest weight loss or greatest number of pounds lost. This is the first mistakemany people make on their journey towards sustainable weight loss – and overall health.

A recent statistic shows that 98% of dieters gain at least some, all, or even more weight than they lost while dieting [2]. This has been a well-known trend for quite some time, and yet, more extreme diets continue to emerge and gain popularity. How can this be? What societal constructs have led us to believe that strict restriction and near happiness are the key criteria needed for success in health? Here, we dive into the reasons why people turn to fad diets, and how to not only avoid falling into this common trap, but also how to lose weight the right way and keep it off for good.

Why Am I Gaining Weight? Psychology of Weight Gain


According to research, there are a few key reasons why people gain weight. However, these reasons can vary significantly from one person to the next. In order for healthy, sustainable weight loss to take effect, one must first assess and understand the drivers that led to weight gain in the first place. Below are some of the most common factors why people gain weight.

Stress

Poor stress management can be the answer to “Why Am I Gaining Weight”, Cenegenics aids in stress management as one of the steps to lose weight

Stress is indeed a factor in gaining weight, but it is not the stress itself that causes weight gain; rather, it is how stress is managed. For most individuals, stress is a natural aspect of daily life. In fact, stress is normal and, to some degree, even healthy. It keeps us alert and helps us avoid danger. For an upcoming event such as an important work presentation, your body may elevate its heart rate through an increase in catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine).

This increase in heart rate increases blood distribution to your brain, thereby enabling you to become hyper-focused and perform the task at hand successfully. This only occurs successfully, however, if you’re able to control that stress and use it for its true purpose: to become productive and overcome obstacles. Problems begin to arise with prolonged, elevated stress and lack of control. This leads to a fluctuation in hormone levels – specifically, cortisol.

How Does Cortisol Relate to Appetite?

The body’s immediate response to stress is to produce adrenaline. On a short-term basis, adrenaline suppresses appetite. As the blood flows away from your internal organs and to your muscles to prepare for “fight or flight” mode, you begin to feel less hungry. Once that adrenaline subsides, however, it leaves cortisol in its wake. On an occasional basis, spikes in cortisol aren’t bad. Yet, chronic stress can lead to frequent, severe increases in cortisol, also known as “the stress hormone.”

Cortisol doesn’t wear off as quickly as adrenaline; instead, it lingers and signals the body to replenish its food supply. After all, in the wild, fighting off predators would require an immense expenditure of energy. Yet, modern humans that are exposed to consistent stress without control are aggressively conserving fuel – without having a real need to do so.

Cortisol is a catabolic hormone, which means “breakdown.” However, in addition to regulating metabolism, controlling blood sugar levels, and performing other key functions needed for survival, it can also increase fat storage over time. In other words, our neuroendocrine system is still designed to function as it did for our ancestors and does not take into consideration that most modern individuals lead sedentary lifestyles. Thus, cortisol will still prompt you to reach for extra food when you’re unable to control elevated stress, even though your body doesn’t need it.

Stress Induced “Pleasure” Food Cravings

Stress can trigger increased levels of ghrelin which increases your appetite and may be one of the reasons “Why I Am Gaining Weight”, stress eating can cause people to crave highly processed and unhealthy foods which can lead to weight gain

Another factor that plays a role in weight gain is pleasure. While consistent stress spikes cortisol levels, it can also increase appetite through a release of ghrelin. This hormone is released as the body anticipates a need for more fuel to prepare for the impending “danger.” To satisfy our appetite, we understandably reach for food. Yet, the problem lies in the fact that it is not healthy foods we seek. Instead, we crave the foods that provide immediate pleasure.

Foods that are easy to eat, highly processed, and high in sugar or unhealthy fats tend to quell appetites driven by stress-related factors. They release dopamine, a neurotransmitter that aids in controlling the brain’s reward and pleasure centers. The dopamine momentarily relieves our stress, almost allowing us to forget that it’s there. Yet, it isn’t long before the cravings come back – often even stronger than they were in the first place. This cycle sets the foundation for poor behaviors, which comprise the third reason behind weight gain.

Influence on Individual Behavior

External factors such as TV shows and movies can influence behaviors we implement to combat weight gain, Weight loss can be influenced by external factors such as life events and physical activity which is why Cenegenics focuses on these as one of the steps to losing weight

Behavior should be the first point of focus for anyone pursuing weight loss. Yet, behavior is influenced in so many ways that it often becomes dependent on external factors. From magazines to TV shows, movies and the people around us, there are a number of outside sources which influence our actions. The behaviors we implement to combat weight gain are often a product of someone or something else – the latest fad diet recommended by a coworker, an ad for a weight loss supplement, and so forth – but are rarely spurred by intrinsic motivators. This is a major reason why even individuals who do lose weight successfully tend to gain it back.

In an article published in Obesity Reviews, [3] numerous aspects of human personality were examined in relation to weight loss and failure to maintain weight loss. These components included:

  • Physical activity
  • Eating patterns
  • Weight loss goals
  • Life events and social support
  • Self-efficacy, among others

What most of these components have in common is that, when they are changed intrinsically, they yield better results. More often than not, if the decision to change came from an external source, quick results were achieved. However, once that external factor was no longer relevant, the weight was gained back rapidly. This sheds light on one of the chief components of weight loss and weight management which is also, quite frankly, the hardest one to master: self-accountability.

Thus, in order to enact lasting change, individuals must start by identifying their true purpose for pursuing their goals. Fad diets do not cater to these goals, but there are other shortcomings beyond that which we’ll discuss next.

Understanding Why People Gain Weight – In Conclusion


Losing weight is a highly sought after goal. With over 70% of the U.S. population being obese or overweight, it is not uncommon to stumble upon various websites that promise the best solution with minimal effort. However, fad diets and exercise programs is the first mistake many people make on their journey to sustainable weight loss.

Understanding the reasons behind your weight gain is where you should start. There are three common factors to why people gain weight: stress, pleasure eating induced by stress, and outside influences on individual behaviors. Stress releases cortisol, a hormone that tends to linger and trigger signals to the body to replenish its food supply.

Chronic stress can consistently spike cortisol levels, forcing us to crave “pleasure foods”: foods that are highly processed, and high in sugar or unhealthy fats. Lastly, outside influences such as TV shows, movies, or the people around us, tend to influence our individual behaviors including our amount of physical activity, our eating patterns, and our goals. This is why your next weight loss plan should be custom tailored to your specific needs and with your health in mind – Cenegenics will help you accomplish long-term, sustainable weight loss.

Next Steps to Lose Weight


Register for your complimentary phone consultation.

We hope the information above assisted you in your research process.

Key Resources on Weight Loss


This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources:

Joshua D’Alessandro MS, CSCS, CISSN 

Nutrition & Exercise Counselor at Cenegenics New York City

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation 

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

Additional Resources on Weight Management with Cenegenics


Cenegenics Elite Health Program: Why You Should Consider Age Management Your Next Investment

What is Cenegenics?

What is Age Management Medicine?

Bariatric Surgery Alternative

Anti-Aging vs. Age Management

Weight Loss: Role of Exercise

Nutrition for Weight Loss

How Weight Loss on the Cenegenics Program Differs from Your Typical Weight Loss Program

Defy Your Age with Cenegenics

Sources on Weight Loss


[1] Ducharme, Jamie. “About Half of Americans Say They’re Trying to Lose Weight.” 12 Jul. 2018. Retrieved from URL: http://time.com/5334532/weight-loss-americans/

[2] Elfhag, K., and S. Rossner. “Who Succeeds in Maintaining Weight Loss? A Conceptual Review of Factors Associated with Weight Loss Maintenance and Weight Regain.” Obesity Reviews, vol. 6, no. 1, 2005, pp. 67–85.

[3] Elfhag, K et al. See above.

Obese and overweight individuals have significantly higher risk factors of type 2 diabetes than the rest of the population, Weight and inactivity increase risk factors of type 2 diabetes and increases chance of stroke and cardiovascular disease, controlling weight is one of the main methods to manage type 2 diabetes

Recognizing Your Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes

Article at a Glance

  • Risk factors of type 2 diabetes include weight, inactivity, poor nutritional habits, poor lipid metabolism, genetic factors and age.
  • Exercise and nutrition are two of the main factors for controlling type 2 diabetes.
  • You can manage type 2 diabetes with your Cenegenics physician, and if you are prediabetic, Cenegenics can help reduce the risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes through custom-tailored programs that help combat disease.

Previously, we discussed the factors that comprise metabolic syndrome and place individuals at a greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Nonetheless, conditions encompassed by metabolic syndrome are not the only factors which determine a person’s risk for type 2 diabetes. Frustratingly, some individuals seem inherently more inclined to develop the disease than others. While researchers still do not understand the precise interplay among risk factors, it is clear that certain criteria do increase risk.

Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes


 being overweight is an important risk factor of type 2 diabetes, a DXA scan can give a physician better insight into a patient’s risk factors of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, managing risk factors is important for controlling type 2 diabetes

Here are some of the factors to consider when analyzing your risk for developing type 2 diabetes:

  • Weight
  • Inactivity
  • Genetic factors
  • Poor eating habits
  • Poor lipid metabolism
  • Age

Weight

Being overweight is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Specifically, the greater the amount of fatty tissue a person has, the more resistant their cells are to insulin. Moreover, fat distribution is also a telling indicator as patients whose body fat is concentrated in the abdomen face a greater risk than those who store it elsewhere, such as the hips. Visceral fat, or the deep abdominal fat surrounding your organs, also has an inflammatory impact on the body, increasing risk factors for heart disease, cancer, and potentiating other age-related risk factors.

One obstacle that has impeded physicians’ ability to determine weight-related risks is the fact that measuring fatty tissue and its distribution is not as simple as calculating BMI and, in fact, determining what is considered “overweight” might not be as simple as we once thought it was. Body mass index was historically the golden standard for determining healthy weight ranges by height. However, there are patients who do not meet BMI criteria for obesity but do have excess body fat. Conversely, some individuals may have a higher composition of muscle and are considered overweight for their height according to BMI. For this reason, using a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan is the best way to measure actual body fat and thereby give physicians insight into a patient’s risk for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. DXA scans are encompassed by the initial testing performed for all Cenegenics patients.   

Inactivity

Leading a sedentary lifestyle can be a precursor for type 2 diabetes. It is well-established that regular exercise contributes to reducing obesity and, in turn, diabetes. Sedentary activities such as watching TV for long periods of time are strongly associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes. In fact, research confirms men who watch more than 40 hours of TV per week face a nearly threefold increase in risk compared to those who watch less than one hour [1]. Thus, while diet plays an important role in controlling risk factors, physical activity cannot be overlooked.

Genetic Factors

If a parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes, you face a greater risk of developing the disease. However, the disease does not have a clear pattern of inheritance, and researchers suspect that while shared genetic factors may contribute, the increased risk is also a result of shared behaviors [2]. 

Poor Eating Habits

Perhaps one of the most obvious risk factors for type 2 diabetes is poor diet. Sugary drinks, processed carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and trans fats should all be avoided or consumed sparingly, and alcohol consumption should also be controlled.

Insufficient Lipid Metabolism

Your body’s ability to break down the storage of fatty acid molecules (lipids) for energy is referred to as lipid metabolism. Lipids can signal many cellular responses, and the more inflammatory fatty acids eaten, the more they shift the inflammatory balance and gene transcription. Poor lipid metabolism can lead to high cholesterol, contributing to an elevated risk for type 2 diabetes

Age

While the risk of type 2 diabetes increases with age, some researchers believe this is largely due to increased inactivity that comes with aging. Lost muscle mass and weight gain can increase diabetes risk [3].

In the final section, we will discuss some of the ways Cenegenics helps you address these risk factors, as well as how our clinicians help type 2 diabetes patients regain control over their disease to enjoy an improved quality of life.

Preventing and Controlling Type 2 Diabetes 


Exercise not only facilitates weight loss but also helps improve insulin sensitivity, Exercise and nutrition can help facilitate a healthy insulin response and are important to help manage type 2 diabetes, Exercise can often be an important factor for controlling type 2 diabetes

While examining diabetes risk factors can be overwhelming for adults in their middle ages and beyond, it is important to remember that, again, type 2 diabetes is often preventable – even for patients who have been diagnosed with prediabetes. With proven approaches backed by science, Cenegenics clinicians promptly establish an all-encompassing exercise and nutrition plan. The first priority is not necessarily to facilitate weight loss, but instead to improve the all-important measure of insulin sensitivity.

To decrease high levels of insulin caused by insulin resistance, Cenegenics physicians will develop a tailored nutrition program with an emphasis on whole food sources. Vegetables, nuts, beans, fish, and other lean sources of protein are some examples of foods that can facilitate a healthy insulin response.

The clinical team will also compose an exercise program based on your current physical fitness levels. High-intensity interval training is considered most effective for losing and controlling weight as it requires a minimal time investment yet pushes the body to burn calories, boost metabolism, and improve heart health. With that said, patients who have been sedentary for long periods of time may be eased into exercise with appropriately challenging routines.

Following the initial assessment and plan development, Cenegenics collects lab values from blood draws at specific intervals to closely monitor insulin resistance and ensure improvement is being made. Once high levels of insulin are brought under control, then the body can improve the utilization of fuel sources during exercise, allowing weight loss to occur more appropriately.

Those with type 2 diabetes or near diagnosis can also benefit from the proactive and attentive care provided by Cenegenics clinicians. By processing lab work and regularly observing patients’ biomarkers, our clinical team is able to dynamically adjust the approach needed to facilitate the best possible outcome to control diabetes or drastically reduce your risk.

Research shows lifestyle changes are enough to reduce the risk of progressing from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes by more than 58% [4]. Yet, while most individuals know that avoiding or controlling diabetes demands a reassessment of certain lifestyle factors, they are often left unsure of the best place to start. Cenegenics provides a 100% personalized, physician-developed program with the ultimate objective of minimizing disease risk. It is based on proven principles and gives you a detailed roadmap for addressing age-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Thus, no matter where you currently stand in relation to diabetes risk, Cenegenics can help you lead your healthiest possible life.

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes – In Conclusion


Nearly 10% of the population suffers from diabetes, a growing epidemic in the United States. Type 2 diabetes is typically diagnosed later in life and is most common for those who are obese or overweight.

Cenegenics custom-tailored programs help combat diabetes and are especially useful in reversing prediabetes. Cenegenics clinicians establish an all-encompassing exercise and nutrition plan to facilitate weight loss, but more importantly to improve insulin sensitivity. Cenegenics physicians help patients make important lifestyle changes to help reduce their risk of progressing from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular disease.

Next Steps to Reduce Your Risk and Manage Type 2 Diabetes 


Register for your complimentary phone consultation.

We hope the information above assisted you in your research process.

Key Resources for Understanding Type 2 Diabetes 


This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources:

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Education Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

Additional Information about Cenegenics and Treating Type 2 Diabetes 


What is Cenegenics?

Anti-Aging vs. Age Management

What is Age Management Medicine?

Defy Your Age with Cenegenics

The Dangers of Processed Foods

How Weight Loss on the Cenegenics Program Differs from Your Typical Weight Loss Program

Building a Nutritional Plan: Food for Weight Loss

Weight Loss: Role of Exercise

Sources on Type 2 Diabetes 


[1] Hu, FB. Sedentary lifestyle and risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Feb. 2003. Retrieved from URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12733740

[2] “Type 2 Diabetes.” U.S. National Library of Medicine. Nov. 2017. Retrieved from URL: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/type-2-diabetes#inheritance

[3] “Type 2 diabetes.” Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from URL: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/syc-20351193

[4] MacGill, Markus. “What’s to know about insulin resistance?” Medical News Today. 17 Feb. 2017. Retrieved from URL: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/305567.php

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

What is Type 2 Diabetes?

How is Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosed?

What are the Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes?

Next Steps to Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Nearly 10% of the population is afflicted with diabetes making it among the most common diseases in the U.S. While type 1 diabetes is commonly diagnosed in children, type 2 diabetes is typically diagnosed later in life. It is more common among overweight or obese populations, as well as individuals over the age of 45. The illness is chronic meaning that while it can be controlled through medication and lifestyle, it cannot be cured. Although many people do indeed continue to lead fulfilling, active lives following a diagnosis, disease management is indeed essential as diabetes remains the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S [1]. The serious nature of the disease, combined with its overwhelming prevalence, has led it to become a critical focus for physicians, especially age management specialists.

While addressing the type 2 diabetes epidemic may seem like a monumental feat given the above statistics, there is in fact some good news. People almost always have prediabetes before developing type 2 diabetes, and while more than 84 million American adults (or roughly one in three) have prediabetes, the condition can be reversed [2]. Moreover, for individuals who already have received a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, the medical advancements and resources available today have made disease management more effective than ever.

As the nation’s leader in age management medicine, Cenegenics is committed to helping adults lower their disease risk and achieve optimal health. Here, our clinicians provide an in-depth look into this common disease including how thorough and accurate health care can help you lower risk or manage your condition more effectively. We will begin with a brief overview of type 2 diabetes to help you develop an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms behind the disease.

What is Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes goes beyond just understanding blood sugar levels, Insulin resistance and glucose play a large role in type 2 diabetes

Despite its commonality, few people understand the specific characteristics of type 2 diabetes, including its causative agents. While most people understand that the condition involves blood sugar, there is a more complex interplay among food sources and the body’s functions than you may realize. Learning about the roles of insulin, glucose, and the pancreas can help you better understand what truly causes type 2 diabetes to develop.

What is Glucose? 

Glucose is a sugar which serves as an energy source for cells that make up the muscles and other types of tissues. It is produced by the liver and is also found in the food we eat and is absorbed into the bloodstream with the assistance of insulin. When glucose levels dip too low, the liver will transform stored glycogen into glucose to keep the levels within normal range. However, in people with type 2 diabetes, this process does not work as it should because the cells have developed a resistance to insulin.

Insulin Resistance

Insulin is a key player in both diabetes and metabolic syndrome (we will cover more on that condition later). It is a hormone, which is produced by the pancreas, and it is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose within your bloodstream. As your blood sugar level drops, this naturally causes the level of insulin secreted from the pancreas to drop as well.

Problems begin to arise when cells become insulin resistant. While the precise cause for insulin resistance remains unknown, it is suspected that genetics and environmental factors, including being overweight, are contributing factors. Insulin resistance prevents cells from being able to use insulin effectively, leaving blood sugar levels higher than they should be. As a result, the pancreas produces more insulin to reduce blood sugar. This can ultimately leave the pancreas depleted of insulin-producing cells, which is a trend commonly observed in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Metabolic Syndrome 

Oftentimes, you will hear diabetes discussed in conjunction with metabolic syndrome. While the two are linked, they are not the same. Metabolic syndrome refers to a cluster of conditions, such as high blood pressure and abdominal obesity, which places an individual at higher risk of stroke, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. On their own, conditions such as high blood pressure are serious, but when experienced in combination with the other factors that make up metabolic syndrome, they increase disease risk even more.

It is estimated that nearly a quarter of all Americans have metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by three or more of the following metrics:

  • Systolic blood pressure of 130 mm HG or greater, or diastolic blood pressure of 85 mm HG or greater
  • HDL cholesterol of less than 40 mg/dL in men or less than 50 mg/dL in women
  • Triglyceride level of 150 mg/ dL of blood or greater
  • Waist circumference of greater than 40 inches for men, or 35 inches for women
  • Fasting blood sugar of 100 mg/dL or greater [3]

To put it into perspective, a fasting blood sugar level of 100 to 125 mg/dL is considered prediabetes, which is one reason why individuals with this indicator of metabolic syndrome are also at a greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

How is Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosed? 

The A1C blood test is the best-known method for testing diabetic risk factors

The National Institutes of Health recommends all individuals age 45 or older, as well as younger adults who are overweight, obese, or have other diabetes risk factors, be tested for type 2 diabetes on a routine basis, such as every year. While the A1C blood test is perhaps the best-known method for testing, it only measures average levels of blood sugar over the last three months. An emerging test is the HOMA2-IR test, which measures the actual levels of insulin resistance and is also used to identify metabolic syndrome. In studies, the test has been found to be a more effective predictor of diabetes and can actually evaluate functionality of cells in the pancreas [4]. All Cenegenics patients’ lab work includes this measurement. While it is not the only basis on which a prediabetes or type 2 diabetes diagnosis is made, it is valuable when included into a number of diagnostics reviewed by our clinicians.

What are the Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes? 

Type 2 diabetes develops gradually. In the disease’s early stages, symptoms can be mild and difficult to recognize, which may partially account for the prevalence of undiagnosed cases; in 2015, an estimated 7.2 million people were found to have the disease but had gone undiagnosed [5]. Nonetheless, some patients do experience the following symptoms:

  • Frequent Urination: Excess glucose spurs the kidneys to flush it out of the blood resulting in more urine production and the need to urinate more often. This also doubles the risk of urinary tract infections in people with type 2 diabetes [6].
  • Increased Thirst: With increased urination, you will also begin to feel dehydrated. Dry mouth and intense feelings of thirst could be signs of type 2 diabetes.
  • Feeling Very Hungry: Insulin resistance causes the body to create more insulin which sends signals to the brain that you are hungry.
  • Exhaustion: When the cells are starved of sugar, you may find yourself experiencing fatigue.
  • Delayed Healing of Sores: Type 2 diabetes impedes your body’s ability to heal and fight off infections so, in addition to delayed healing, patients may experience frequent infections.
  • Unexplained Weight Loss: Without the ability to provide enough glucose for your cells, you may begin to lose weight. This can also result from lost water weight caused by frequent urination.
  • Blurred Vision: Rapid changes in blood sugar are associated with blurred vision, but once the disease is controlled, this symptom (as with many others on this list) should go away.

While there may be additional side effects in either the early phases of disease development or after it has been diagnosed, this list represents some of the most common initial indicators.

Recognizing Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes – In Conclusion

Type 2 diabetes develops gradually and the symptoms are often hard to recognize. In 2015, an estimated 7.2 million people with diabetes had gone undiagnosed. But it still remains the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.

People almost always present as prediabetic before progressing to type 2 diabetes; a surprising statistic considering that prediabetes is reversible. Cenegenics is committed to helping adults lower their risk of disease and achieve optimal health. Our physicians provide an in-depth look into this common disease, recognizing that symptoms such as frequent urination, increased thirst, delayed healing of sore, unexplained weight loss and blurred vision are not simply symptoms of aging.

Next Steps to Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Register for your complimentary phone consultation.

We hope the information above assisted you in your research process.

Key Resources on Type 2 Diabetes 

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources:

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Education Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

Additional Information about Cenegenics and Treating Type 2 Diabetes

What is Cenegenics?

Anti-Aging vs. Age Management

What is Age Management Medicine?

Defy Your Age with Cenegenics

The Dangers of Processed Foods

How Weight Loss on the Cenegenics Program Differs from Your Typical Weight Loss Program

Nutrition for Weight Loss

Weight Loss: Role of Exercise

Sources on Type 2 Diabetes 

[1] Statistics About Diabetes. American Diabetes Association. 22 March 2018. Retrieved from URL: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

[2] “Did you know type 2 diabetes can be prevented?” CDC. Retrieved from URL: https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/takethetest/

[3] Statistics About Diabetes. American Diabetes Association. 22 March 2018. Retrieved from URL: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

[4] “Did you know type 2 diabetes can be prevented?” CDC. Retrieved from URL: https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/takethetest/

[5] Statistics About Diabetes, see above.

[6] Masters, Maria. “7 Warning Signs of Type 2 Diabetes.” Everyday Health. Retrieved from URL: https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/symptoms/warning-signs-of-type-2-diabetes/#increased-thirst-or-a-dry-mouth-may-signal-diabetes

Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) and Food Preparation Tips for Reducing Inflammation in Your Diet

What Are AGEs and the Impact of Inflammation?

What Causes AGEs?

Which Foods Are Naturally Low in AGEs?

How Do We Strike a Healthy Balance?

What Can You Do to Lower AGEs and Inflammation? – In Conclusion

Next Steps to Reduce AGEs and Inflammation

 

Today, conflicting information about the best approach to nutrition and food preparation is rampant. While magazines, websites, and social media sources in both the fitness and food industries tend to publish contradictory pieces of advice, one source which continues to be a definitive resource for credible information is science. Specifically, scientifically-proven, definitive dietary recommendations provide insight into the things we can do to improve our eating habits and, subsequently, our overall health.

One emerging area of interest in the food science research community is that of advanced glycation end-products, also known as AGEs. While further research must be conducted to confirm the precise role these agents play in our nutrition and overall health, this guide will examine some of the conclusions, which have been drawn from completed studies.

What Are AGEs and the Impact of Inflammation?


sugar contributes to an increase of AGEs in the body, sugars combined with free amino acids or fats to create chemical reactions

AGEs are a multifaceted array of compounds produced by the body as a result of various chemical reactions. They are typically formed when sugars (such as glucose and fructose) combine with free amino acids or fats. This process serves as a natural function of daily metabolism and is not inherently harmful. In healthy adults, it occurs at normal rates; however, a certain set of both controllable and uncontrollable factors can increase AGEs content in the body, causing them to reach unhealthy levels. Specifically, the process is more likely to occur when blood sugar levels are elevated; thus, individuals with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes tend to have higher AGEs levels.[1][2]

Beyond affecting metabolism, elevated AGEs can also lead to an increase in oxidative stress and inflammation, both of which are key contributors to long-term chronic illnesses, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. In general, an accumulation of AGEs wreaks havoc on the cells, leading to premature aging. Although researchers have yet to determine whether AGEs play a causative role in the following conditions, they have been linked to insulin resistance, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, rheumatoid arthritis, cataracts, kidney disease, and even certain types of cancer. Moreover, AGEs can clog tiny blood vessels, known as the microvascular system, all throughout the body. This is especially dangerous in the heart, kidneys, and brain, and could contribute to the complications many diabetes sufferers experience.[3]

While the body has its own ways to filter out AGEs, including through enzymes and the kidneys, it simply is unable to keep up with a surplus of AGEs. And, those formed in the body are more likely to accumulate when individuals fail to control the ways through which they are consumed.

What Causes AGEs? 


To further understand AGEs and their potential role in the development of chronic disease, we must first understand what proliferates them. Time is one known factor which leads to a rise in AGEs. With age, the body undergoes years of routine metabolic breakdown, which ultimately leads to the elevation of AGEs. Nonetheless, research shows that in healthy individuals – including older adults – the level of AGEs is normal and expected. Thus, outside of the typical proliferation of AGEs which occurs with age, we must assess other variables which can lead to the increase in AGEs. From what researchers have found, nutrition is among the most powerful causes of increased levels of AGEs.[4]

 

How Does Nutrition Impact the Level of AGEs?

The Western diet can increase the level of AGEs, The Western diet is high in saturated fat and sugar

Some foods are inherently higher in dietary AGEs than others. The typical Western diet, for instance, is high in:

  • Saturated fats (including non-grass-fed meats and other poor-quality sources of animal products)
  • Added sugars
  • Fried foods
  • Processed foods

These foods and their preparation methods can have a significant impact on the concentration of AGEs in the body, in addition to many other negative health markers. For instance, in a meta-analysis, fatty meats (specifically, low-quality red meats) and processed carbohydrates such as cakes, cookies, and crackers had the highest AGEs content. Dairy and other cheeses showed high AGEs content as well. Sources of lean protein, such as seafood and white meat poultry, had a lower concentration of AGEs than red meat and dairy. The lowest levels were featured in whole food, non-processed carbohydrates, including plant foods such as fruits and vegetables, as well as whole grains.[5]

Beyond the food source itself, research also tells us that the ways in which we prepare our food also accounts for a variance in AGEs level. Exposure to high heat for an extended period of time can lead to an increased level of AGEs, for instance, especially in animal products. Boiling, steaming, and stewing meat can reduce the level of AGEs by 50%, compared to frying, searing, roasting, and sautéing. In the aforementioned study, all common preparation methods for meat and poultry were compared, and the findings were telling: broiling meat and chicken can increase the content of AGEs to 5,800 kU/100g. Boiling or stewing, on the other hand, brings that figure down to 1,200 to 2,000 kU/100g.[6]

Additionally, findings have shown that marinating food in vinegar, lemon juice, and other acidic substances activates the compound aminoguanidine. This compound inhibits the formation of AGEs in food as it cooks. Specifically, marinating meat in an acidic base up to an hour before cooking has shown to significantly lower the overall AGEs content of the food.

Which Foods Are Naturally Low in AGEs? 


Foods that are naturally low in AGEs, Consuming plants and whole grains helps reduce AGEs

In addition to reducing the AGEs content in the meat we consume, it is also a wise practice to consume foods which have inherently low levels of AGEs. As mentioned previously, these food sources consist primarily of plants, including vegetables and fruits, as well as whole grains and legumes.

While they do not contain meats, processed carbohydrates including breads, cookies, crackers, and cakes tend to be much higher in AGEs. This is due to the fact that they are prepared with solid fat sources, such as non-organic and non-grass-fed dairy butter, and baked at temperatures known to increase AGEs levels.

How Do We Strike a Healthy Balance? 


While it might seem simple to cut out all animal products from our diet to lower the AGEs levels in our food intake, this simply isn’t realistic for many modern Americans. In fact, doing so could cause us to miss out on critical nutrients needed to support optimal health and bodily functioning.

Essential amino acids, in particular, are needed to build lean mass when combined with a well-balanced training program. While it is possible to substitute plant proteins for meat products to some degree, fish, eggs, and meat are highest in these critical nutrients. Some essential amino acids cannot be created by the body and therefore must be consumed. Animal protein has the highest ratio of essential amino acids; therefore, consuming high-quality animal protein is the most effective way to ensure healthy muscle protein synthesis.

When it comes to consuming meat, many medical professionals would argue that the benefits received from high-quality sources, especially when prepared in ways that reduce AGEs levels, outweigh the potential risks of the remaining AGEs left in the food. However, the same cannot be said for processed foods. Cakes, cookies, crackers, and processed meats are the greatest offenders in terms of increasing AGEs, as well as other inflammatory markers. These foods tend to have high levels of simple sugars, are cooked at high temperatures, and have little to no nutritional value. They are typically low in micronutrients, or vitamins and minerals. Moreover, these foods present the greatest threat to one’s health in virtually all areas. While cutting them out of the diet to lower AGEs is a worthwhile endeavor, many individuals also reduce their intake of nutritionally deficient processed foods to achieve other goals as well, such as lower blood sugar levels (A1C) to reduce the risk of or control diabetes, or to simply lose weight.

What Can You Do to Lower AGEs and Inflammation? – In Conclusion


Further research must still be done for experts to understand the effect of AGEs on the proliferation of chronic inflammation, stress, and disease. Nonetheless, based on what we have seen so far, it is clear that lowering AGEs through healthy dietary approaches can only help individuals reduce inflammation and minimize the risk of deadly diseases. Here are some key takeaways to bear in mind.

Weight training and protein sources help outweigh AGEs and inflammation, Man weight training to maintain lean muscle and lower AGEs

Weight training is essential to building and maintaining lean muscle mass and, in order to support this process, individuals must have ample amino acid protein sources in their diet. This facilitates muscle protein synthesis. While animal protein is considered highest in AGEs, when consumed in proper amounts according to individual needs and prepared in a way to minimize AGEs, its benefits are believed to outweigh any long-term risk of disease. Individuals should focus on consuming high-quality protein sources, such as lean animal protein, high in essential amino acids. Cooking meat slowly and marinating in vinegar, lemon or other citrus can lower the AGEs content. Minimizing consumption to red meat sources is also suggested and, when it is consumed, grass-fed beef is best. Solid fat sources, such as butter, should be from organic, grass-fed dairy and should be consumed in moderation.

While processed carbohydrates, such as those found in cookies, cakes, and breads, are high in AGEs; whole, unprocessed carbohydrates support long-term health. Fruits, vegetables and whole grains are not only low in AGEs but also high in fiber, micronutrients, and phytochemicals. All of these components enable the body’s ability to remove free radicals and oxidative metabolites, strengthening its natural antioxidant system and subsequently lowering inflammation and disease risk. Although further studies must be conducted surrounding AGEs in these and other food sources, the research on AGEs supports what we already know about whole food carbohydrates, which is that they are essential to long-term health, exercise performance, and wellness.

In terms of exercise, individuals can benefit from combining cardiovascular activity, weight training, high-intensity interval training (HIIT), and flexibility exercises. Pursuing a balance among these activities is the best way to maintain the strength and elasticity of the muscles. It also helps to maintain healthy blood pressure levels and resting heart rate. These exercises, when combined, also increase cardiovascular capacity and decrease the rate of oxidative stress development as we age.

Ultimately, nutrition is among the most important factors in healthy aging, and optimizing one’s diet is the most powerful approach we have at our disposal to minimize inflammation and control risk factors for serious diseases. While readily available, processed foods have the worst impact on our health; they are nutrient-poor but calorie-dense, and typically high in AGEs.

While lowering AGEs is not the only way to minimize inflammation and lower the risk of chronic illness, it stands out as an important one. As the medical field evolves its understanding of these harmful agents, it is likely proactively made attempts to control them through optimizing diet and following a balanced exercise regimen that we will see the best long-term health outcomes..

Next Steps to Reduce AGEs and Inflammation


Register for your complimentary phone consultation.

 

We hope the information above assisted you in your research process.

Key Resources on AGEs and Inflammation 


This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources:

 

Joshua D’Alessandro MS, CSCS, CISSN                                                                                                                                                                                               Nutrition & Exercise Counselor at Cenegenics New York City

 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation

 

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

Additional Information on Effectively Managing Your Diet


What is Cenegenics?

What is Age Management Medicine?

What Does Cenegenics Cost?

Nutrition for Weight Loss

Cenegenics Alternatives: Why the Original Age Management Program Reigns Superior

The Dangers of Processed Foods

Sources on AGEs


[1] Uribarri, Jaime, et al. “Advanced Glycation End Products in Foods and a Practical Guide to Their Reduction in the Diet.” Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 110, no. 6, June 2010, pp. 911–916., doi:10.1107/s0108768107067079/bk5067sup1.ci

[2] “What Are AGEs (Advanced Glycation End-Products)?” Berkeley Wellness. Retrieved from URL: www.berkeleywellness.com/healthy-eating/food-safety/article/abcs-ages-advanced-glycation-end-products.

[3] Berkeley Wellness, see above.

[4] Uribarri, Jaime, et al, see above.

[5] Uribarri, Jaime, et al, see above.

[6] Uribarri, Jaime, et al, see above.

Low Energy: How the Cenegenics Program Boosts Energy & Combats Fatigue

Improving Your Diet: Eating to Boost Energy

How Can You Exercise If You Always Have Low Energy?

How Cenegenics Can Help Combat Fatigue 

Poor Sleep & Fatigue: How it Relates to Low Energy

Are Hormones to Blame for Low Energy? 

Could Supplements Help Combat Low Energy?

Is Cenegenics Right for Helping You Boost Energy Levels? – In Conclusion

Next Steps to Boost Energy and Combat Fatigue

If you are suffering from low energy and are constantly thinking, “I need energy now”, you are not alone. Research shows that 40% of Americans wake up feeling tired most days of the week [1], and a startling 97% of Americans have at least one of the leading risk factors for fatigue [2]. Yet, if you are like many of the other individuals who experience exhaustion, you may have come to accept feeling tired as an unavoidable part of life.

In fact, there is a reason why you are always feeling tired – even if you have yet to identify it. Much like our overall wellness, our energy levels are defined by a complex combination of factors. From optimizing your diet to addressing hormone imbalances, there are proven, practical ways to boost energy and start improving your quality of life. And, for adults with busy lifestyles, there’s no better way to do it than through Cenegenics. Our age management program is designed for busy adults actively pursuing their personal and professional goals, whose success and performance depend on their ability to maintain optimal energy levels. Discover how our clinical team can help you address your fatigue, boost energy and restore your vitality below.

Improving Your Diet: Eating to Boost Energy


At the most fundamental level, the very purpose of eating is to provide our body with the energy it needs to support its many critical functions. Yet, the abundance of packaged and processed foods has transformed eating into a pleasure-driven activity centered on convenience, rather than a health-driven activity conscious of the dangers of processed foods. Indeed, the Western diet is characterized by foods that have little inherent nutritional value, which ultimately leave us feeling exhausted instead of energized.

To combat the issue, Cenegenics physicians prioritize a way of eating that spurs energy creation. One foundational aspect of improving diet in patients is optimizing their insulin sensitivity. Insulin, the hormone responsible for controlling blood sugar levels, is produced in the pancreas and helps to move sugar from the blood into storage. When cells become insulin resistant, however, they cannot use insulin effectively and therefore leave blood sugar levels higher than they should be. This spurs a vicious cycle in which the pancreas creates more insulin to reduce blood sugar when it detects high sugar in the blood. Over time, this process can deplete the pancreas of insulin-producing cells, a trend commonly found in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Beyond being linked to serious health conditions, poorly controlled blood sugar is also a common cause of fatigue [3]. Thus, optimizing insulin sensitivity is among the most effective means to boost energy levels through diet.

Macronutrients play an integral part in providing the body with the energy necessary to perform essential processes on a cellular level, Micronutrients are often overlooked since the role of micronutrients is more widely known

Cenegenics’ team of dietary experts apply the concept of glycemic index (GI) in the introductory phase of treatment to help patients understand the ways in which different food sources impact blood sugar levels. In fact, GI was originally developed to help patients with diabetes manage insulin dosing. Low GI foods are typically digested slowly, thereby reducing the risk of the insulin spike, which abruptly reduces blood sugar levels and leads to the infamous “crash” we feel after eating something sugary. Eating lower GI foods also results in satiation despite taking in fewer calories, and a low-GI diet can even improve hormone-related response to food intake.

Carbohydrates high in fiber and other phytonutrients have a lower GI than heavily processed white breads, pastas, and similar foods. They can be energizing as well as satiating and, combined with quality protein and fats rich in essential fatty acids, are digested slowly and can aid in optimizing insulin sensitivity. However, the complex relationship between diet, satiety, and energy requires an individualized approach. For instance, some patients may benefit from incorporating marine fish oils and other food sources specifically to improve cognitive function, reduce anxiety, and address other symptoms that can impact perceived energy levels. As such, each patient receives individualized nutrition counseling through the Cenegenics program to pinpoint the key contributors behind possible fatigue-causing dietary factors.

Beyond nutrition, our clinical staff will also help you establish an exercise regimen that fits your lifestyle and actually spurs energy production instead of leaving you feeling tired, which brings us to our next point.

How Can You Exercise If You Always Have Low Energy?


 Routine exercise can actually combat fatigue and low energy, Cenegenics Elite Health programs incorporate exercise which can act as a natural energy enhancer

Feeling tired is perhaps the most common reason people neglect to exercise. Yet, it is worth noting that training and exercising can actually fight fatigue and act as natural energy enhancers. Research shows that exercise can even reduce symptoms of fatigue by as much as 65%, while boosting energy levels by up to 20% [4]. While the precise interplay among exercise and energy levels has yet to be understood by researchers, some believe the ability to reduce fatigue stems from the impact energy has on the central nervous system [5].

How Cenegenics Can Help Combat Fatigue 


Specifically, the Cenegenics program favors short bouts of high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, customized to each patient’s own physiology and goals. With the understanding that the majority of Cenegenics patients lead busy lifestyles, this form of exercise is considered beneficial due to the fact that it achieves optimal results, including 24-hour energy expenditure similar to that produced by traditional endurance training, despite its reduced time commitment.

Moreover, HIIT is considered anaerobic exercise. This short-lasting, high-intensity form of fitness occurs when the body’s demand for oxygen exceeds the available oxygen supply. It therefore relies on energy sources stored within the body. Bouts of anaerobic training are also shown to increase growth hormone production and serum concentrations of testosterone, which is more beneficial to boost energy levels than longer bouts of moderate-intensity exercise which raise cortisol levels. High cortisol, especially in the evening, can deceive the body into thinking it doesn’t need rest, thereby contributing to poor sleep and, ultimately, fatigue.

Cenegenics physicians devise a tailored exercise plan for patients based on their preferences, skills, and ability. Because each patient begins with their own unique fitness starting level, recommendations are individualized and fine-tuned throughout the course of treatment to support optimal results, including improved energy levels. Ultimately, while some programs aim to exercise participants to the point of exhaustion, the goal of our physician-prescribed fitness programs is to do more with less time and take a healthy, sensible approach to working out so that you feel more energized – instead of drained – each day. At the same time, the regular periods of activity will also help to spur tiredness at the appropriate time: when you’re ready for bed. Discover more about how Cenegenics helps to optimize your sleep cycle in the next section.

Poor Sleep & Fatigue: How it Relates to Low Energy


Cenegenics Elite Health programs explore multiple factors of poor sleep as it can cause fatigue and low energy, Cenegenics provides all-encompassing programs to wellness that tackles the root cause of low energy

Poor sleep is perhaps the most obvious culprit behind fatigue and lack of energy. Yet, if you are always feeling tired, you probably know that frustratingly, simply feeling exhausted sometimes is not enough to facilitate quality sleep.

To make matters worse, there are many potential causes of sleep deprivation, which is why a “one-size-fits-all” fix cannot be applied. The inability to fall asleep, and subsequently remain sleeping for the recommended seven to nine hours, can result from either physical or psychological challenges. For some patients, psychological barriers such as stress are the greatest barriers of a good night’s sleep. For others, a condition such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) could be to blame.

Duration and quality of sleep are both commonly improved on a Cenegenics program. This is due to the fact that the program’s all-encompassing approach to wellness often tackles the root causes behind poor sleep. Physicians’ recommendations on food selection, along with tailored dietary tips and exercise routines, can contribute to addressing the challenges that may be causing lack of sleep in patients.

For example, while weight regulation is one of the pillars of the Cenegenics age management program, it is also a key player in the prevention and treatment of OSA (obstructive sleep apnea). In fact, research shows that losing just 22 pounds can significantly improve apnea/hypopnea index scores [6]. Likewise, Cenegenics physicians may also utilize nutraceuticals to aid in sleep. Individualized supplements, including magnesium, magnolia bark, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) can be taken under the direction of physicians to facilitate restfulness.

Additionally, our clinical team can assist patients in hormone regulation if needed. While the relationship between hormones and energy levels will be reviewed in greater detail in the next section, it is suspected that there is also a relationship between sleep disorders and hormones. Specifically, testosterone affects the organization of circadian rhythms and timing of sleep.

Are Hormones to Blame for Low Energy? 


Consult with your Cenegenics physician to understand how your hormones are affecting your low energy, suboptimal levels of hormones can negatively affect a person’s energy levels

As mentioned above, one major component of the Cenegenics program is optimizing hormone levels. In both women and men, suboptimal levels of testosterone can have a negative effect on a person’s energy levels. Because significant dips in hormone levels are common in older adults, men and women in their middle ages and older may be ideal candidates for hormone replacement therapy.

In both genders, low testosterone has been linked to lack of motivation, fatigue, and even depression. Thus, testosterone has a far-reaching impact on energy and, when it becomes imbalanced, the physical impacts can escalate. Luckily, hormone replacement therapy is an effective way to address the challenging symptoms produced by an imbalance.

The age management experts from Cenegenics specialize in all aspects of age management and are particularly adept at diagnosing and treating testosterone deficiencies. They understand the inherent variabilities of testosterone levels and therefore perform diagnostics at specific times and take into consideration factors such as health status, age, fasting state, and sleep to determine if hormone replacement therapy should be considered. While there is no single consensus on what defines “low” testosterone, in general, patients beginning the program with a total testosterone reading in the 300s and low free testosterone may be recommended for treatment. By increasing and improving free testosterone levels (which fall within the normal physiologic range), patients will notice a considerable improvement in energy levels. The effects can be optimized further when combined with the measures outlined above, as well as nutraceuticals, described in greater detail below.

Could Supplements Help Combat Low Energy?


Cenegenics Elite Performance Power is a supplement used as a pre-workout to boost energy, Cenegenics CoQ10 is a vitamin-like compound that can be used to boost energy

We mentioned briefly above that Cenegenics physicians may prescribe nutraceuticals for patients in which there has been an identified need for a specific supplement. While nutraceuticals can aid in sleep, as previously mentioned, it is also possible that certain micronutrients could help to support optimal energy levels, too.

Coenzyme Q10 (CQ10), for example, can be used to boost energy production, as well as cardiovascular health, neurological wellness, and blood sugar levels. While this antioxidant also plays a critical role in helping the body regenerate the production of vitamins, the body’s synthesis of CQ10 begins to decline at approximately 30 years of age. It has also been shown to reduce fatigue during workouts. Although CQ10 is found in food sources such as meat and fish, nuts, seeds, and plant oils, most people are unable to reach even lower ends of the suggested dietary intake through diet alone. Thus, a supplement administered in the proper dose based on the patient’s needs assessment may aid in the natural production of energy.

Additionally, cinnamon may play a role in increasing energy, as well as improving circulation and aiding digestion. The spice has also been shown to directly improve insulin levels, possibly through slowing the absorption of carbohydrates in the small intestine. Thus, when taken regularly, it is possible cinnamon could have widespread benefits on overall health.

When it comes to nutraceuticals, it is important to note that supplements are not subject to nearly as strict regulation as pharmaceuticals. Purity and potency are either up to the consumer to research or the manufacturer to offer, and because many patients do not report their supplements in their list of medications, drug interactions are even more likely to occur. It is thus critical that any supplements be taken under the direction of licensed physicians. Moreover, the quality of the source is critical. Nutraceuticals, such as healthy energy boosters provided by Cenegenics, bear significant differences from generic, retail-grade supplements. Cenegenics patients receive custom pharmacy items and efficaciously-dosed, pharmaceutically-tested clinical nutraceuticals.

Is Cenegenics Right for Helping You Boost Energy Levels? – In Conclusion


While determining the potential cause(s) behind fatigue and energy depletion might ordinarily take patients months or even years to do, the robust testing performed under the care of Cenegenics clinicians upon the inception of the age management program may help uncover a causative agent quickly. Sometimes, the culprit behind energy depletion could be as simple as suboptimal vitamin intake, which can be easily remedied through nutraceutical and dietary measures. In other cases, there may be a complex array of contributing factors behind fatigue which require a comprehensive treatment program to address.

No matter the scenario, Cenegenics is the best source for achieving lasting and noticeable improvements in energy levels. Increased energy is one of the five key pillars on which the program itself was built, and the four supporting pillars also strengthen each patient’s ability to feel and perform better. Through the robust yet detail-oriented approach to wellness, our clinical team will address the barriers to optimal energy levels you are facing, while also lowering disease risk factors and supporting your overall, long-term wellness.

Next Steps to Boost Energy and Combat Fatigue


Register for your complimentary phone consultation.

We hope the information above assisted you in your research process.

Key Resources on How to Boost Energy


This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources:

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation

 

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Available for purchase here

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

Additional Information on How Cenegenics Can Boost Energy


What is Cenegenics?

What is Age Management Medicine?

What Does Cenegenics Cost?

Nutrition for Weight Loss

Cenegenics Alternatives: Why the Original Age Management Program Reigns Superior

The Dangers of Processed Foods

Understanding Mental Acuity: Improving Focus, Memory and Concentration with Cenegenics

How Cenegenics Can Help Relieve Stress in Executives & Professionals

Why Can’t I sleep? – Clinical Explanations

How Cenegenics Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) Differs from Low Testosterone Clinics

Sources on Low Energy 


[1] Moore, Peter. “Two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week.” YouGov. 02 June 2015. Retrieved from URL: https://today.yougov.com/topics/lifestyle/articles-reports/2015/06/02/sleep-and-dreams

[2] “43 Percent of Americans Admit They’re Too Tired to Function at Work.” Occupational Health & Safety. 27 Jul. 2017. Retrieved from URL: https://ohsonline.com/articles/2017/07/27/43-percent-of-americans-admit-they-are-too-tired-to-function-at-work.aspx

[3] Laskey, Jen. “Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Make You Feel So Tired?” Everyday Health. 25 Jan. 2017. Retrieved from URL: https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/why-does-type-2-diabetes-make-you-feel-tired/

[4] Timothy W. Puetz et al. “A randomized controlled trial of the effect of aerobic exercise training on feelings of energy and fatigue in sedentary young adults with persistent fatigue.” Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. 14 Feb. 2008. Retrieved from URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18277063

[5] Parker-Pope, Tara. “The Cure for Exhaustion? More Exercise.” The New York Times. 29 Feb. 2008. Retrieved from URL: https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/02/29/the-cure-for-exhaustion-more-exercise/

[6] Foster et al. “A Randomized study on the effect of weight loss on obstructive sleep apnea among obese patients with type 2 diabetes: the Sleep AHEAD study.” Archives of Internal Medicine. 28 Sept. 2009. Retrieved from URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19786682.

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