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Woman holding holographic 3D render of human intestine

The GI-Map Test – a Window Into Our Epigenetic Gene Mapping of the Gut Microbiome

All Disease Begins in The Gut.

Hippocrates

More than 2,000 years ago, Hippocrates understood “All Disease Begins in the Gut.”

Fast forward to 2020, healthcare is moving deeper into the space of personalized medicine and understanding how the genetic expression of our gut microbiome can elevate our health.

Our GUT MICROBIOME is the key to UNLOCKING PRISTINE HEALTH.

The Gut Microbiome


Bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microscopic living things are referred to as microorganisms, or microbes. Trillions of these microbes exist mainly inside your intestines and on your skin. There are more bacterial cells in your body than human cells. There are roughly 40 trillion bacterial cells in your body and only 30 trillion human cells. That means you are more bacteria than human. [1,2] In fact, there are up to 1,000 species of bacteria in the human gut microbiome weighing as much as 2–5 pounds (1–2 kg); each of them extremely important in determining your current and future health status. [3]

Recent studies have suggested the intestinal microbiome plays an important role in modulating risk of several chronic diseases, including:

It is now understood that diet plays a significant role in shaping the microbiome, with experiments showing that dietary alterations can induce large, temporary microbial shifts within 24 hrs.

The ecosystem of bacteria in the human gut operates dynamically, like any other human organ. In order to ensure stability in the face of constant disturbance, microbiota species are continuously interchangeable by means of the metabolites produced by the action of gene products contained in the gut bacteria. [5]

What is Epigenetics and how is it impacted through our DIET?


Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene function that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms include the covalent modifications of DNA and histones. [6]

Emerging evidence strongly suggests that consumption of dietary agents can alter normal epigenetic states as well as reverse abnormal gene activation or silencing. [7] Such diet-induced epigenetic changes may provide the key mechanistic link between diet-induced diseases and thus may serve as targets of intervention. [8]

How Can You Optimize Your Gut Microbiome by Unlocking Your Gene Mapping Through GI-Map Testing?


Microbial trends of gut microbiome

Gene mapping is the sequential allocation of Loci to a relative position on a chromosome. Genetic maps are a necessary tool for mapping of disease genes or trait loci. [9] Gastrointestinal Microbial Assay Plus or the GI-MAP™ test [10,11,12,13] is an innovative clinical tool that measures gastrointestinal microbiota DNA from a single stool sample with state of the art, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR or real-time PCR) technology. Since the GI-MAP is a DNA-based test, results reflect the levels of pathogenic strains carrying the toxin genes, not the levels of any toxins that may be produced.

The GI-MAP was designed to detect microbes that may be disturbing normal microbial balance or contributing to illness as well as indicators such as:

What does the GI-MAP Test?


The GI-MAP tests for PATHOGENS known to cause intestinal gastroenteritis:

  • Parasitic Pathogens
  • Viral Pathogens
  • Normal Commensal Bacteria
  • Opportunistic Bacteria
  • Fungi/Yeast
  • Viruses
  • Parasites
  • Worms
  • Intestinal Health Markers of Digestion/Malabsorption
  • Crucial GI Markers of Digestion/Malabsorption
  • Antibiotic Resistance Genes

Who Is a Good Candidate for GI-Map Testing?


GI-MAP Testing may be indicated if YOU suffer from or have a FAMILY HISTORY of one of the following:

  • Impaired immune function
  • Intestinal infections and proinflammatory dysbiosis
  • Inflammatory bowel disease:
    • Upper GI Bleeds that cause Iron Deficiency Anemia
    • Celiac
    • Poor Diet - High dietary intake of sugar, starches, and fungi
    • Vegetarians/Vegans
    • Maldigestion or Hypochlorhydria (Low Stomach Acid)
    • Bloody diarrhea, Hemorrhagic colitis, may progress to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)
    • Polyps
    • Diverticulitis
    • Colorectal cancer
  • Gall Stones
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Food allergens and/or Food sensitivities
  • Toxins and Drugs:
    • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]
    • Antibiotics
  • Contamination:
    • Fecal contamination of food, water and liquids (eggs, poultry, undercooked meat, raw shellfish, raw milk/dairy products, vegetables, and unpasteurized juice)
    • Swimming in Contaminated water (Ocean, lakes, streams, ponds, pools)
    • Skin Contact with Contaminated Soil
    • Contaminated Pets - Cats and Dogs
    • Diarrhea in infants and children spreading to adults
    • Sexual contact with contaminated persons

How Can the GI-Map Test Change Your Gut Microbiome?


The GI-MAP Test can pinpoint the pathogenic source and provide clinically proven therapeutic protocols to ameliorate the pathologies listed above promoting a healthy intestinal barrier or Gut Microbiome for optimal health.

Next Steps to Discovering Your GI-Map

FREE Consultation

Cenegenics New York now offers the GI-Map Testing. Our world class physicians create a personalized plan to help you feel 10+ years younger. You'll be more energetic, lose weight, sleep better, have more libido, and think more clearly. Click below to schedule a free consultation with one of our physicians. It's quick + easy.

About the Contributor

Dr. Cynthia Barrett

Dr. Cynthia Barrett
PT, DPT, CSCS, CNS

Dr. Cynthia Barrett, PT, DPT, CSCS, CNS, is Founder and CEO of Wellness Couture, LLC, which provides targeted testing and evaluation as the foundation for the next level of health, nutrition and fitness based on each client’s unique microbiota and chemical makeup. Her success tailoring custom-made wellness programs for clients led her to partner with Cenegenics NYC, where she leads their Advanced Food and Nutrient Testing Program.

Dr. Barrett is a Certified Nutrition Specialist (CNS), focusing on the Gut Microbiome. Dr. Barrett has been featured in Business Insider and Women’s Day Magazines, providing expert nutrition insight. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Community Health Education from Hunter College and obtained her Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) from New York University.

References

[1] Sender R, Fuchs S, Milo R. Revised Estimates for the Number of Human and Bacteria Cells in the Body. PLoS Biol. 2016;14(8):e1002533. Published 2016 Aug 19. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002533

[2] Qin J, Li R, Raes J, et al. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing. Nature. 2010;464(7285):59–65. doi:10.1038/nature08821

[3] Integrative HMP (iHMP) Research Network Consortium. The Integrative Human Microbiome Project: dynamic analysis of microbiome-host omics profiles during periods of human health and disease. Cell Host Microbe. 2014;16(3):276–289. doi:10.1016/j.chom.2014.08.014

[4] Singh RK, Chang HW, Yan D, et al. Influence of diet on the gut microbiome and implications for human health. J Transl Med. 2017;15(1):73. Published 2017 Apr 8. doi:10.1186/s12967-017-1175-y

[5] Miro-Blanch J and Yanes O (2019) Epigenetic Regulation at the Interplay Between Gut Microbiota and Host Metabolism. Front. Genet. 10:638. doi: 10.3389/fgene.2019.00638

[6] Berdasco, M., Esteller, M. Clinical epigenetics: seizing opportunities for translation. Nat Rev Genet 20, 109–127 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41576-018-0074-2

[7] Hardy TM, Tollefsbol TO. Epigenetic diet: impact on the epigenome and cancer. Epigenomics. 2011;3(4):503–518. doi:10.2217/epi.11.71

[8] Ideraabdullah FY, Zeisel SH. Dietary Modulation of the Epigenome. Physiol Rev. 2018;98(2):667–695. doi:10.1152/physrev.00010.2017

[9] Kelly L. Williams, in Encyclopedia of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, 2019

[10] Angol DC, Ocama P, Ayazika Kirabo T, Okeng A, Najjingo I, Bwanga F. Helicobacter pylori from Peptic Ulcer Patients in Uganda Is Highly Resistant to Clarithromycin and Fluoroquinolones: Results of the GenoType HelicoDR Test Directly Applied on Stool. BioMed research international. 2017;2017:5430723.

[11] Segata N, Haake SK, Mannon P, et al. Composition of the adult digestive tract bacterial microbiome based on seven mouth surfaces, tonsils, throat and stool samples. Genome Biol. 2012;13(6):R42.

[12] Fraser SL. Enterococcal infections. 2017; https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/216993-overview#a5. Accessed Jul 4, 2018.

[13] Walsham NE, Sherwood RA. Fecal calprotectin in inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical and experimental gastroenterology. 2016;9:21-29.

PHOTO CREDIT ***
Moya A, Ferrer M. Functional redundancy-induced stability of gut microbiota subjected to disturbance. Trends Microbiol. 2016. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2016.02.002.

Man doing leg raise exercises

Healthy Workout Routines from Home

You have to push past your perceived limits, push past that point you thought was as far as you can go.

Drew Brees

The power of exercise goes a long way. It’s essential that we continue to focus on our physical and mental wellness, and one of the best ways to do that is by engaging in regular workout routines.

According to research, people who exercise have lower rates of anxiety and depression than their sedentary peers. It’s believed that physical activity can help the brain cope with stress better. In particular, working out releases endorphins, the body’s feel-good hormones which aid in stress relief. Even five minutes of aerobic exercise can trigger anxiety-curbing effects such as:

  • Improve mood
  • Better sleep
  • Decrease tension

For the best results, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise. Take a brisk walks or 75 minutes of high-intensity exercise, like running or swimming, each week. [1]  

Physical activity has immune system benefits. It has an anti-inflammatory influence and helps support immune regulation. There is a direct correlation between moderate exercise and reduced risk of illness. [2]

Cenegenics patients lead busy lifestyles and may not always be able to log hours at the gym each week. We provide exercise recommendations to help our patients fulfil their physical fitness needs. We take a scientific approach to tuning the body at a cellular level for ideal functioning. We help patients reverse their biological age, rebalance the body to where it was during their 20s and 30s. Within 30 to 60 days on our program, patients begin to feel better.

You’ll find both cardio and yoga workouts below. The goal of the high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts is to elevate the heart rate to near maximal levels, bring it down for quick recovery, and then push yourself again

These time-efficient workouts can:

Combined with yoga, these exercises are ideal for fatiguing the muscles, keeping belly fat at bay, and maintaining steady insulin levels. Pick a circuit for each day and keep a fresh rotation so you can still enjoy a varied workout routine from home. Here are a few at-home workout routines you can do without equipment. There are modifications available for any move which may feel too difficult.

20-Minute Cardio Workout Routine


To master this circuit, perform the moves below in the sequence listed.

Beginners should aim for 30 seconds of work followed by 30 seconds of rest, and perform the entire circuit two times through.

Intermediate-level exercisers should aim for 30 seconds of work followed by 15 seconds of rest. Perform the entire circuit two to three times.

If you’re at an advanced fitness level, perform the moves for 30 seconds with minimal rest between for a total of three sets. Or work with your nutrition & exercise specialist for a personalized 20-minute routine.

Here are the moves:

  • Jumping jacks: Start in a neutral standing position, then jump your legs out and bring your arms overhead. Return back to standing with arms at your side; that’s one rep.
  • Mountain climbers: From a pushup position, bring in one knee towards your chest. Repeat on the other side for one rep.
  • High knees: From a standing position, jog in place, bringing your knees up to hip level or higher.
  • Jump lunges: Start in a lunge position, then jump to switch sides so the opposite leg is in front, landing in a lunge. If the impact is too much on your joints, step into a lunge on the opposite side.
  • Squat jumps: Start in a squatting position, then jump up and land again in a squat, keeping the weight in your heels. That’s one rep.
  • Burpees: Jump up, then drop down and into a pushup position. Perform one pushup, then get back up to perform the jump to complete a rep.   
  • Butt kickers: Jog in place, bringing your feet up high enough to kick your glutes.
  • Side-to-side hops: Jump from side to side, touching the toes of the foot in the direction you’re jumping.

Full-Body No-Equipment Circuit

Athletic woman doing plank exercise

Like the workout routine above, this circuit will get your heart pumping while also improving strength. Perform up to three rounds, taking breaks only as you need them.

  • Pushups: Perform 15 reps.
  • One-legged squat: While standing on one leg, squat and touch your toes. Perform 15 reps, then repeat on the other side.
  • Chair dips: Use a sturdy chair or bench, and sit facing away, with your palms on its edge. Keep your feet flat on the floor and hold yourself up, lowering until your elbows hit 90 degrees. Perform as many reps as possible until your triceps feel fatigued.
  • Wall sit: Place your back against a wall and slide down, inching your feet out until your legs are at a 90-degree angle. Hold for as long as you can, aiming for at least one minute.
  • Crunches: Lie with your back on the floor, knees bent and feet flat. With your fingertips behind each ear, curl up, raising your shoulders a few inches off the ground. Hold for two beats and repeat for 30 reps.
  • Supermans: Lie flat on your stomach with your arms and legs stretched out. Raise your legs and arms off the ground a few inches, hold, and then release. Do 20 reps.
  • Reverse crunch: Starting on your back, bring your knees in towards your chest without rocking. Hold for a second before stretching the legs out again. Repeat for 15 reps.
  • Plank: Hold yourself in a pushup position, activating your core to maintain the pose. Maintain the position for 30 seconds. Increase time as needed.
  • Mountain climbers: From a pushup position, bring in one knee towards your chest. Repeat on the other side for one rep; perform for 30 seconds.

Heart-Pounding Low-Impact Workout


You don’t have to perform explosive movements to strengthen your body and elevate your heartrate. Here are a few moves to use on days when your joints need a rest. Perform up to three sets total.

  • Inchworm: from a standing position, reach down so your palms land flat on the floor. Walk hands out into a pushup position, hold, then walk them back and return to standing. Repeat for 15 reps total.
  • Sumo squat: Stand with your feet wider than hip-distance, keeping the toes turned out at a 45-degree angle. Squat down, keeping your glutes back and the weight in the heels. Do 15 reps.
  • Lunge: From a standing position, step one foot forward into a 90-degree angle, keeping the knee behind the toes. Keep your chest lifted. Repeat 15 reps on each side.
  • Curtsy lunge: From a standing position, step your left foot back behind the right, keeping the hips squared and the torso facing the front. Drop into a lunge so the legs are at a 90-degree angle. Keeping your weight in the front heel, rise to standing and repeat the move 15 times on each side.
  • Side plank with twist: Start in a side plank position, so the hand or forearm is below the shoulder and the body makes a straight line. Engaging your core for stability, reach the opposite arm overhead and then down and under the body, twisting the torso. Bring it back up and perform eight reps on each side.

Rejuvenating Yoga


Yoga has many benefits: increased flexibility, strength, energy, athletic performance, and injury prevention. [4] Here are a few moves you can practice, whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned yogi.

  • Cat/cow: Get on all fours, then gaze upwards, dropping your spine towards the floor while inhaling. Hold, then arch your back upwards, dropping the head down as you exhale.
  • Downward-facing dog: Start on all fours, then press back, lifting your knees away from the floor. Your arms should be straight and your tailbone lifted, creating an upside-down “v.” You should feel a deep stretch through your hamstrings, holding for about 30 seconds. If needed, keep the knees bent.
  • Warrior 1: From a standing position, step one leg back in a wide position. Keep your front leg bent at 90 degrees, with your torso facing forwards, then raise your arms overhead. Hold for 30 seconds on each side.
  • Extended Side Angle: From Warrior 1, rotate your torso so that it’s turned sideways. Reach one arm down to touch the floor behind the bent leg. Extend the other arm overhead so that the upper arm grazes the ear, forming a straight line from the back leg to the fingertips. Hold for 30 seconds on each side.
  • Tree: From a standing position, lift one leg and place the bottom of the foot on the inner thigh of the opposite leg. If it’s too difficult to balance there, aim for the calf instead (avoid putting your foot on the side of the knee). Hold for 30 seconds on each side.
  • Camel: From a kneeling position, lean back so that your right hand grasps your right heel. Dropping your chest back and extending your heart upwards. Place the left hand on the left heel. You should feel a stretch in the front of the body, including the legs. Hold for 30 seconds to a minute.
  • Seated Twist: From a seated position, position your legs so that the left foot is under the right leg, outside of the right hip. Situate the right leg over the left with the right foot positioned on the floor outside of the left hip, knee pointed at the ceiling. Twist your torso as far around the right leg as is comfortable; hold for 30 seconds and repeat on the other side.

Workout Routines Done from Home - In Conclusion


There are plenty of full-body exercises you can do right at home to maintain and even improve your fitness.

At Cenegenics, we give our patients the tools and resources they need to optimize their wellness no matter what set of circumstances they may face. We’ve pioneered the medical specialty of age management, and one of our physicians even wrote the book on the subject which other doctors now study. To find out more about Cenegenics cost, what the program entails, or how we can help you meet your wellness goals, visit our Cenegenics reviews page or call your nearest location to set up a consultation.

Disclosure: When participating in any exercise or exercise program, there is the possibility of physical injury. If you engage in this exercise or exercise program, you agree that you do so at your own risk. You are voluntarily participating in these activities, assume all risk of injury to yourself. You agree to release and discharge Cenegenics from any and all claims or causes of action, known or unknown, arising out of Cenegenics.com.

About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba 
Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources: 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

References

[1] Exercise for Stress and Anxiety. Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Derived from: https://adaa.org/living-with-anxiety/managing-anxiety/exercise-stress-and-anxiety

[2] The compelling link between physical activity and the body's defense system. ScienceDirect. Derived from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2095254618301005  

[3] What are the benefits of high intensity interval training (HIIT)? Medical News Today. Derived from: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/327474#benefits  

[4] Maintaining a regular yoga practice can provide physical and mental health benefits. American Osteopathic Association. Derived from:   https://osteopathic.org/what-is-osteopathic-medicine/benefits-of-yoga/   

Human body shielded against viruses.

How the Immune System Works to Fight Disease

Think about your immune system as being an army, and it’s fighting infection.

Mikhail Varshavski

The immune system is essential to keeping us alive. Without it, the body would have no defense against viruses, bacteria, parasites, and other harmful agents. When everything is working as it should in the immune system, you won’t even notice it. Yet, when it becomes weakened or can’t fight especially powerful germs, that’s when things go awry.

Luckily, there are many things you can do to boost your immune system. But first, it’s important to understand how all the elements of the immune system work together.

What Is Your Immune System?

There are a few key players in the immune system which work to keep us healthy. These include different cells, organs, tissues, and proteins. Each of the following has an important role in fighting off disease:

  • Skin: Your skin is the primary line of defense against harmful invaders. Skin cells can create special proteins to fight off microbes, and each layer of skin uses unique immune cells to defend against disease.
  • Bone marrow: Within the bone marrow are stem cells. These powerful cells can transform into almost any other cell type. Some become immune cells, which are the body’s next line of defense against infection after the skin.
  • Bloodstream: The bloodstream is the key method of transportation for immune cells. They use the blood to travel throughout the body and look out for any signs of foreign invaders. Doctors also use a patient’s blood to look for changes in white blood cell levels.
  • Thymus: Located in the upper chest, the thymus is a small organ where certain immune cells mature.
  • Lymphatic system: The lymphatic system allows the immune system tissues and bloodstream to communicate. It’s made up of organs, vessels, and tissue. Immune cells meet in the lymph nodes, which are located in several places throughout the body. There, immune cells share information to activate the appropriate immune response.
  • Spleen: The spleen enriches immune cells. If harmful pathogens are present in the blood, immune cells will activate in this key organ, which is located behind the stomach.
  • Mucosal tissue: Within the respiratory tract and intestines, there are specialized immune hubs. There, immune cells patrol and take samples to look for any pathogens. [1]

How Does the Immune System Activate to Fight Disease?

Antibody Immunoglobulin

The main roles of the immune system:

  • Fights the germs that cause disease, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites.
  • Responds to harmful environmental substances.
  • Fights any changes in the body that cause disease.

When the body encounters something that it doesn’t recognize, the immune system responds. These foreign substances are called antigens. Viruses, bacteria, and fungi all have antigens. The first time the body comes into contact with an, special processes begin to fight it. The innate portion of the immune system uses cells such as natural killer cells to attack the invader. Many components of the immune system contain these cells. [2]

Next, the adaptive portion of the immune system creates antibodies. This allows the body to fight any germs which it has already encountered any time they reappear. The same response kicks in when you get a vaccine. Your body receives a small dose of the illness so it can create antibodies.

Naturally, the new illnesses which your body doesn’t yet have antibodies for pose the greatest threat. Yet, there are still ways to keep your immune system healthy so it can work its best.

What Can You Do to Strengthen Your Immune System?

From taking the best possible care of your body to maintaining good hygiene, here are a few simple things you can do to give your immune system the best chance of fighting off disease.

  • Eat well. Like any system in your body, the immune system needs plenty of nutrients to perform its best. Get plenty of lean protein, vegetables, and healthy fats in your diet.
  • Follow a regular sleep schedule. If you don’t get enough sleep, your body’s white blood cell production can suffer. Try to get at least seven hours of quality sleep each night. [3]
  • Exercise. Be sure to get moderate physical activity on most days of the week. This reduces your risk of catching viruses. [4] Avoid too much strenuous exercise if you’re concerned about your immune system, as exhausting the body could make it more prone to infection. [5]
  • Reduce stress. Find healthy coping mechanisms to handle stress. Consider meditating, journaling, practicing yoga, or another outlet to address any worries.
  • Disinfect your spaces. Wipe down surfaces such as doorknobs, countertops, light switches, and other key areas.
  • Maintain strong hygiene. Wash your hands often for at least 20 seconds. Avoid touching your face and stay away from anyone who may be ill.

In Conclusion – Immune Systems are the Body’s Defense Against Disease

The threat of new illnesses can be overwhelming. Yet, your body already has nature’s best defense against disease, the immune system. Plus, there’s still plenty you can do to stay in control of your health. By following the simple tips above, you can give your body the best chance of staying healthy. Here at Cenegenics®, we prime the immune system for peak performance by taking a highly scientific approach to fine-tuning the body at the cellular level.

About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources: 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

Additional Resources

Understanding Preventive Care: Age Management vs Anti-Aging

Youth is a Feeling – Not a Number

Why Can’t I Sleep? – Clinical Explanations

The Main Causes of High Cholesterol | Road Map to a Heart Attack

The Role of Vitamins and Minerals as Micronutrients

Cenegenics Elite Health Program: Why You Should Consider Age Management Your Next Investment

Causes and Symptoms of Anxiety Disorders

What Is Age Management Medicine?

References

[1] Overview of the Immune System. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Derived from: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/immune-system-overview

[2] How does the immune system work? InformedHealth.org. Derived from:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279364/

[3] Sleep deprivation effect on the immune system mirrors physical stress. National Sleep Foundation. Derived from: https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/sleep-deprivation-effect-immune-system-mirrors-physical-stress

[4] Evaluation of immune response after moderate and overtraining exercise in wistar rat. Zahra Gholamnezhad, Abolfazl Khajavi Rad, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady, Mahmoud Hosseini, and Mojtaba Sankian. National Institutes of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3938879/         

[5] The immune system and overtraining in athletes: clinical implications. AC Hackney and Koltun KJ. National Institute of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23540172

Mature man working from contemporary home.

Productive & Healthy Tips when Working from Home

Either you run the day or the day runs you. 

Jim Rohn

If you’re recently working from home, you may be experiencing challenges as you adapt to your new arrangement. After all, you’ve gotten used to your work life and routine. Even if a break from a stressful commute and other daily irritations may be welcome, by now you may also be finding that working from home isn’t as ideal as you thought it might be.

Now more than ever, it’s essential for you to focus on your mental and physical wellbeing. Work can actually be a timely distraction right now, but it’s also important to find balance. You should ensure professional stressors don’t compound any worries you may already be experiencing. To make your time working from home stress-free, the Cenegenics® team shares a few tips below. 

Many of our patients come from demanding fields, and for some of them, remote work is nothing new. Our clinicians are therefore experienced in helping patients strike a meaningful work/life balance and staying healthy by promoting wellness at every age. With stress management, exercise, and nutritional recommendations, our team helps patients reverse their biological age, rebalancing the body to where it was during their 20s and 30s. They take a highly scientific approach to get the body perfectly tuned at the cellular level, thereby setting them up for optimal performance both professionally and physically. See what they recommend for staying healthy and productive while working from home below.

#1. Master Video Calls


While nothing can replace in-person communications, video conferences are the next best thing. Stay in touch with your teams by having regular virtual check-ins. Make sure your home office is equipped with the technology you’ll need, including a desktop or laptop with a microphone and camera. Test out multiple video chat platform in advance to make sure there are no snags when it’s time for an important professional call.

#2. Maintain a Routine

Routines play an important role in mental health: when we’re organized and know what to expect, we’re better able to keep symptoms of conditions like depression, addiction, and bipolar disorder at bay. Plus, people with stable daytime routines have healthier sleep cycles and are better able to resist impulsiveness. [1]

While there may be some hiccups at first, it’s important to establish and maintain a healthy work routine, even when you’re at home. Get out of bed right when your alarm goes off and resist the urge to hit snooze. While you don’t have to put on your business casual clothing, change out of what you slept in to gear yourself up mentally for the day. Set a lunch time, and “clock out” by walking away from your desk when the day is over. While it may feel like you can let projects run into the night while you’re at home, it’s important to give yourself the time to refresh mentally, which brings us to our next point.

#3. Take Breaks


When there’s little separation between your home space and your work space, it’s easy to get stuck in “work mode” around the clock. Yet, this approach is unhealthy and can actually backfire on your work and mental health. Research shows that overworked employees experience chronic stress, which has been linked to everything from irritability to digestive problems and trouble sleeping. [2]

Over time, chronic stress can also have serious long-term implications on health, including an elevated risk for:  

Breaks during your workday at home may not come as naturally as they would in the office. At work, you might need to get up from your desk to touch base with a colleague, but at home, you could easily find yourself going hours without moving from your desk. Being sedentary presents its own health problems, such as poor blood circulation and increased inflammation. [4] Thus, it’s critically important to take frequent breaks. Set an alarm or reminder on your phone to stand up every hour. Take this time to get up and stretch, walk to refill your glass of water, or even do a few jumping jacks. Don’t forget to take a lunch break, either.

#4. Eat a Healthy Breakfast, Lunch, & Snacks

A set of plated salads. Rustic style. Top view.

You probably had an eating routines before you started working from home, but now that you’re not rushing out the door, you may be able to dedicate a bit more time to your meals and snacks. The food choices we make have significant effects on health, mood, and cognitive performance. [5]

Of course, it can be challenging to come up with healthy breakfast options. Here are a few tips to help:

  • Purchase frozen veggies, like spinach, which you can blend into a smoothie or throw into an omelet.
  • Stock up on plain Greek yogurt and top it off with fresh or frozen fruit instead of choosing sugary varieties.
  • Think outside the box by eating nontraditional breakfast foods in the morning. Breakfast salads and soups can still satisfy your appetite; there’s no reason your first meal has to fall under the traditional “breakfast” category. Instead, aim for nutritional value by incorporating protein, healthy fats, and vegetables.

Don’t overlook the importance of lunch, either. While you may not be able to have your go-to salad from your favorite restaurant, you can still make healthy choices at home. Cook up some frozen chicken at the beginning of the week and reheat it with a side of greens for a quick and easy weekday lunch. Or, prep a big batch of wholesome chili to last you through most of the week. 

Although it takes a little more effort to make healthy snacks the health benefits are ample. Whole foods (fruits & vegetables), animal and vegetarian/vegan protein, and combination snacks are often the most efficient for curbing appetite, maintaining energy, and helping to sustain a regular metabolic rate. Our Cenegenics® physician and clinical team work to provide custom tailored nutritional plans. They help make adjustments based on your lifestyle demands and they help you to effectively utilize your time.

#5. Make Time for Exercise

When you’re not physically going into an office, your daily activity is likely to drop. You won’t be walking to and from your car or taking the stairs, for instance. The good news is that without a daily commute, you might have more time for exercise than you normally would. You might even be able to fit a workout in during your lunch break.

Regular exercise helps to:

For these reasons, you should be aiming for about 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity, such as brisk walks, each day, or shorter bursts of high-intensity interval training. You can also mix up the two to keep things fresh. Fortunately, even when you can’t get to a gym, there are still plenty of heart-pounding workouts you can do at home. Cenegenics® clinical team is always available with support and suggestions.   

#6. Set a “No Interruptions” Time

You’re probably finding yourself with a whole new crew of “coworkers”, your spouse, children, and pets. To ensure your ability to concentrate, it’s important to set boundaries during work time. It may take some fine-tuning to establish a schedule that works for the whole family, but make sure that anyone who needs it can have uninterrupted periods of time dedicated exclusively to work.

#7. Find Ways to Decompress

Switching out of work mode generally takes some time, so give yourself a little bit of a buffer between ending your work day and interacting with family. Take this time to jot down your priorities for tomorrow, go for a quick walk, or even do a short round of yoga. 

#8. Save Household Projects for Later

Working in your home environment may have you crossing paths with piles of laundry, a cluttered closet, or other reminders of everything that needs to get done around the house throughout the day. The weekday hours should be reserved for home projects. Again, the importance of maintaining a regular schedule cannot be overstated.    

#9. Resist the Urge to Scroll Endlessly

Since you’re not physically at work, you may find yourself giving in to distractions a bit more easily. As we mentioned above, breaks are certainly important for your physical and mental health, and they can allow you to come back to work refreshed and ready to go. Yet, your breaks shouldn’t consist of scrolling through the news or social media endlessly. The National Alliance on Mental Illness recommends approaching news consumption mindfully. [7] Limit your sources for updates to trusted authorities and try to consume only need-to-know news instead of clicking on every headline.

Staying Productive While Working From Home – In Conclusion

While it’s everyone’s priority to simply get through these challenging times, now is also a good opportunity to focus on your physical and mental health. Cenegenics® patients, including a high population of doctors and their families, trust in our physicians to help them feel dramatically better within 30 to 60 days on the program, and thus better equipped physically and mentally to manage any challenges life presents. We’ve pioneered the medical specialty of age management medicine to help our patients navigate optimal wellness at every stage of life, and one of our doctors even wrote the book on the subject, which is now used to teach other doctors. Don’t just take our word for it, though—visit the Cenegenics® reviews page to find out why so many satisfied patients continue to stay on the program and feel their best.

If you’re ready to find out more about what to expect on the program, learn about the Elite Health Evaluation, or inquire about Cenegenics®’ cost, contact your nearest location to set up a free consultation.

Next Steps – Learn about more Healthy Lifestyle Tips

FREE Consultation

Our world class physicians create a personalized plan to help you feel 10+ years younger. You'll be more energetic, lose weight, sleep better, have more libido, and think more clearly. Click below to schedule a free consultation with one of our physicians. It's quick + easy. 

About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba 
Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources: 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

References

[1] The Power of Routines in Your Mental Health. Plata, Mariana. Psychology Today. Derived from: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-gen-y-psy/201810/the-power-routines-in-your-mental-health

[2] New Study Shows Correlation Between Employee Engagement And The Long-Lost Lunch Break. Kohll, Alan. Forbes. Derived from: https://www.forbes.com/sites/alankohll/2018/05/29/new-study-shows-correlation-between-employee-engagement-and-the-long-lost-lunch-break/#16c03fd04efc

[3] Health consequences. Medical News Today. Derived from: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323324#health-consequences

[4] Health Risks of an Inactive Lifestyle. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Derived from: https://medlineplus.gov/healthrisksofaninactivelifestyle.html

[5] Breakfast: The most important meal of the day? Spence, Charles. Science Direct. Derived from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1878450X17300045

[6] Exercise: 7 benefits of regular physical activity. Mayo Clinic. Derived from: https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389

[7] Coronavirus: Mental Health Coping Strategies. Ponte, Katherine BA, JD, MBA, CPRP. National Alliance on Mental Health. Derived from: https://www.nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/March-2020/Coronavirus-Mental-Health-Coping-Strategies

Managing Stress and the Immune System

It’s not the load that breaks you down, it’s the way you carry it. 

Lou Holtz

Medical experts have long suspected an important link between the immune system and stress. In recent decades, their suspicions have been confirmed through research. The body’s stress response, while meant to protect us in the face of danger, can actually wreak havoc on our ability to fight off illness and can even contribute to disease over a prolonged basis.

Fortunately, Cenegenics is here to help. While it’s not always easy to keep worries at bay — especially during uncertain times — we’ve pioneered the medical specialty of age management and are well-suited to help patients develop healthy coping mechanisms that will benefit their immune system. Discover our insights for tackling stress to improve immunity below.

The Link between the Immune System and Stress

When we experience stress, the brain sends defense signals to the endocrine system. In response, it releases a surge of hormones to prepare the body for fighting an emergency. On a short-term basis, this function serves us well: it allows us to react quickly and appropriately in dangerous or high-stakes situations.

Yet, this response also suppresses our immunity. It releases cortisol, which in turn decreases white blood cells and natural killer cells (special cells which fight tumors and viruses), leading to an increased rate of infection and tissue damage. Slight dips in immunity from time to time aren’t cause for concern, but when stress persists over a continual basis, its effects become cumulative and can significantly impact the immune system. [1]

Stress responses affect the body on many levels. For one, they impact the digestive system: adrenaline spikes caused by stress can create stomach ulcers, for instance. The stress response also increases the heart rate, straining the circulatory system and ultimately raising blood pressure. Over time, the elevated heart rate can result in an accelerated buildup of cholesterol, leaving individuals more susceptible to cardiovascular problems. [2] Clearly, stress and the immune system go hand-in-hand, and increased or prolonged exposure to stressors can have a domino effect on the body’s ability to fight illness.

While chronic stress is indeed dangerous, the harmful effects of stress can even manifest over a short period of time. In studying medical students, researchers have found that immunity dropped for students during a three-day span of exams. Not only did the students have fewer natural killer cells, but they nearly stopped producing immunity-boosting gamma interferon. T-cells, which fight infections, also showed a diminished response. [3]

It therefore should come as no surprise that stress is linked to a number of serious health conditions, including:

In fact, some experts believe stress could be responsible for up to 90% of illness and serious disease. [4] Left unaddressed, high stress causes sustained levels of inflammation, which has been linked to the progression of many immune system disorders including:

  • Fibromyalgia
  • Lupus
  • Psoriasis
  • Arthritis
  • Inflammatory bowel disease [5]

Fortunately, there are ways to control stress, and thus, its effects on the immune system.

What Can You Do to Control Stress?

Businessman meditating in lotus pose

Since stress and the immune system will always be inextricably tied, the best way to prevent stressors from compromising immunity is to find healthy de-stressors. Here are a few practices to implement into your routine.

  • Meditate: Even if you’ve never tried it before, setting brief periods of time aside for mindfulness can help minimize stress and anxiety. According to research, 10 to 15-minute sessions of meditation practiced three to four times per week can reduce cortisol levels and inflammation, while also preventing chromosomal breakdowns linked to cancer and premature aging. [6]
  • Yoga: Another simple yet powerful stress-relieving practice, yoga reduces the levels of stress hormones in the body and eases the nervous system. It often incorporates deep breathing, which can actually improve your body’s ability to resist infections. Inverted poses, such as downward facing dog and shoulder stands, help to filter toxins from the body by circulating fluid through the lymphatic system. [7]
  • Social support: Research indicates people with strong social connections have better health overall and are better able to resist infections and diseases. [8] In studies, college students without established friendship circles showed higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol than their peers, and researchers identified a weakened immune response caused by loneliness. [9] Staying socially active, even if it’s just via FaceTime or phone calls, can help mitigate stress and its effects.

Of course, there are several other ways to minimize stress, including regular exercise, which can further boost the body’s immune system. Regular physical fitness can flush bacteria from the airways, reducing the risk of illness, and generate positive changes in antibodies and white blood cell levels. [10] Similarly, getting ample sleep and following a healthy diet can produce immune-boosting effects which could help to alleviate health-related worries, even if they don’t necessarily lead to immediate reductions in stress.

Importance of Stress Management – In Conclusion

Combatting stress should be a priority for all individuals, not only for its effects on mental health but to control its impact on our physical wellbeing, too. Here at Cenegenics, we not only recommend healthy practices for coping with stress, but we also prime the immune system for peak performance by taking a highly scientific approach to fine-tuning the body at the cellular level. Patients in our program have an advantage when it comes to avoiding and fighting off illness: their biological clock has been reversed and their body has been rebalanced to where it was in their 20s and 30s. As a result, they feel better within 30 to 60 days of starting the program — just see what they have to say on our Cenegenics review page.

We’re the “doctor’s doctor,” with 25% of our patient base comprising physicians and their family members. If you’re ready to see why so many experts trust us with their wellness, want to inquire about Cenegenics’ cost, or simply have questions about the program, don’t hesitate to contact your nearest location today.

Next Steps – Reinforce your Immune Health

FREEConsultation

Our world class physicians create a personalized plan to help you feel 10+ years younger. You’ll be more energetic, lose weight, sleep better, have more libido, and think more clearly. Click below to schedule a free consultation with one of our physicians. It’s quick + easy.

About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources:

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

Additional Resources

Understanding Preventive Care: Age Management vs Anti-Aging

Youth is a Feeling – Not a Number

Why Can’t I Sleep? – Clinical Explanations

The Main Causes of High Cholesterol | Road Map to a Heart Attack

The Role of Vitamins and Minerals as Micronutrients

Cenegenics Elite Health Program: Why You Should Consider Age Management Your Next Investment

Causes and Symptoms of Anxiety Disorders

What Is Age Management Medicine?

References

[1] How Stress Affects the Immune System. Goliszek, Andrew Ph.D. Psychology Today. Derived from: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/how-the-mind-heals-the-body/201411/how-stress-affects-the-immune-system

[2] Stress, Illness and the Immune System. McLeod, Saul. Simply Psychology. Derived from: https://www.simplypsychology.org/stress-immune.html

[3] See above. Derived from: https://www.simplypsychology.org/stress-immune.html

[4] See above. Derived from: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/how-the-mind-heals-the-body/201411/how-stress-affects-the-immune-system

[5] What Happens When Your Immune System Gets Stressed Out? Cleveland Clinic. Derived from: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/what-happens-when-your-immune-system-gets-stressed-out/

[6] See above. Derived from: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/what-happens-when-your-immune-system-gets-stressed-out/

[7] See above. Derived from: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/what-happens-when-your-immune-system-gets-stressed-out/

[8] See above. Derived from: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/how-the-mind-heals-the-body/201411/how-stress-affects-the-immune-system

[9] Stress Weakens the Immune System. American Psychological Association. Derived from: https://www.apa.org/research/action/immune

[10] Exercise and immunity. U.S. National Library of Medicine, Medline Plus. Derived from: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm

Variety of vitamin pills in wooden spoon on white background with green leaves

How to Boost Your Immune System with Supplements

“The modern diet is grossly deficient in hundreds of important plant-derived immunity-building compounds which makes us highly vulnerable to viruses, infections and disease.”

Joel Fuhrman, MD

Whether it’s flu season or the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are many reasons why it’s important to foster immune resilience. A measure of the body’s ability to handle an attack, immune resilience can vary significantly based on factors like current health and nutrition. As you might imagine, the stronger the immune system is, the greater its odds of effectively fighting off any virus.

Fortunately, there are several things you can do to start strengthening your immune system right now. For instance, vitamin D supplements have been shown to reduce influenza mortality rates, especially in elderly individuals. Some experts have even speculated that it can play an important role in enhancing resistance — perhaps even as effectively as a flu shot. [1]

At Cenegenics, we have pioneered the medical specialty of age management medicine. We therefore believe in supporting a healthy immune system in our patients of all ages to help improve their resistance to illness of any kind. For this reason, we take a highly scientific approach to getting the body tuned at the cellular level, prompting ideal functioning. Oftentimes, this includes introducing a supplement regimen. Discover our take on how to boost your immune system with supplements below.

How Gut Health Enhances Your Immune System


When it comes to boosting your immune system, the importance of gut health cannot be overstated. There is significant interaction between gut bacteria and the immune system. While researchers are still studying this interplay, it’s apparent that the ecology of the gut can either help or hinder disease prevention. [2]

To that end, it’s critical to continue promoting a healthy population of gut microflora by eating a variety of nutrient-rich foods while avoiding processed foods. Aside from practicing sound nutrition, however, you can further boost your immune system with probiotics. These supplements provide the body with a healthy dose of “good” bacteria and have been shown to mediate immunoregulatory effects. In fact, they’ve shown therapeutic potential for not only chronic conditions such as allergies and eczema, but also viral infections. [3] While you can take probiotic supplements, you can also explore dietary sources, including fermented foods such as sauerkraut or kimchee.

In addition, you might also consider taking prebiotics. While probiotics are beneficial bacteria, prebiotics help to promote the development of the good bacteria that already exists in your microbiome. These, too, have been shown to stimulate the immune system. [4]

Finally, to further promote gut health, avoid any triggering foods if you have a food allergy or intolerance. For many individuals, grain and dairy sensitivities may require some extra attention.

Beneficial Supplements for Ideal Immune Heath


Young female doctor or nurse holding a yellow transparent pill in hand. Doctor presents a new medicine to a patient.

Beyond promoting gut health, you can also boost your immune system across the entire body by taking supplements. Here are a few to consider:

  • Vitamin D3: This vitamin modulates both the innate and adaptive immune responses in the body. You can only take in vitamin D through your skin (via sunlight), from diet, and from supplements. A deficiency in vitamin D is associated with an increased susceptibility to infection. [5] Vitamin K2 is often paired with vitamin D3. While vitamin D ensures proper calcium absorption, K2 directs it to the bones instead of the arteries, where issues such as calcification could otherwise occur.
  • Andrographis: This powerful herb has compounds known as andrographolides which appear to have antioxidant, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. [6]
  • Beta-Glucan: Found naturally in yeast, some cereal grains, and certain mushrooms, beta-glucans are polysaccharides which have been linked to improvements in immunity, blood sugar management, and cholesterol. [7]
  • Green Tea Extract & L-Theanine Blend: L-theanine is an amino acid found in green tea leaves which has been linked to immune-boosting benefits, such as decreased incidence of upper respiratory tract infections and improvements in gastrointestinal inflammation. [8]
  • Elderberry: Hailed as a natural way to boost the immune system during flu seasons, this plant has been used to combat upper respiratory infections and strengthen immunity for centuries. [9]
  • Arthricor Olive Extract: Olive leaf extract has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and immune-stimulating properties, making it a powerful therapy for the prevention and treatment of infections. [10]
  • Vitamin C: Vitamin C intake is essential to immune function. Your body can’t produce or store vitamin C, but a lack of the nutrient could make you more susceptible to illness. [11]

The Importance of Immune Resilience - In Conclusion


Whether it’s an outbreak of a novel illness or the height of cold and flu season, hearing reports of thousands falling ill can be alarming. Yet, the goal for staying healthy should always be preparation, not panic.

Cenegenics patients already have an advantage over their peers when it comes to immune resilience. Through tactics like individualized nutraceutical recommendations, our doctors prioritize immune function and help to reverse the biological age of patients by rebalancing the body to where it was in their 20s and 30s. Within just 30 to 60 days on the program, patients begin to feel dramatically different. In fact, many of our patients are doctors and their families who trust in our physicians to help them achieve the best line of defense against illness: optimized health at every age. Find out what they’re saying about their experience with the program by visiting our Cenegenics review page.

If you’re ready to discover how we can help you boost your wellness, want to inquire about Cenegenics cost, or are ready to schedule your Elite Health Evaluation, contact your nearest Cenegenics location today.

Next Steps – Strengthen your Immune System

FREE Consultation

Our world class physicians create a personalized plan to help you feel 10+ years younger. You'll be more energetic, lose weight, sleep better, have more libido, and think more clearly. Click below to schedule a free consultation with one of our physicians. It's quick + easy. 

About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba 
Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources: 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

References

[1] Vitamin D and Influenza—Prevention or Therapy? Gruber-Bzura. National Institutes of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6121423/

[2] The Gut: Where Bacteria and Immune System Meet. Fields. The Johns Hopkins University, Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. Derived from: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/research/advancements-in-research/fundamentals/in-depth/the-gut-where-bacteria-and-immune-system-meet

[3] Probiotics and immune health. Yan, Fan and Polk, D.B. National Institutes of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4006993/

[4] Effects of prebiotics on immune system and cytokine expression. Shokryazdan,  Faseleh, Jahromi M, Navidshad, B, and Liang, JB. National Institutes of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27704207

[5] Vitamin D and the Immune System. Aranow, Cynthia, MD. National Institutes of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3166406/

[6] The Health Benefits of Andrographis. Wong, Cathy and Fogoros, Richard MD. Very Well Health. Derived from: https://www.verywellhealth.com/can-andrographis-boost-immune-function-89538

[7] The Health Benefits of Beta-Glucan. Wong, Cathy and Fogoros, Richard MD. Very Well Health. Derived from: https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-beta-glucan-89418

[8] l-Theanine as a Functional Food Additive: Its Role in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Williams, Jackson, Kellett, Jane, Roach, Paul Daniel, McKune, Andrew Mello, Duane, Jackson, Thomas and Naumovski, Nenad. MDPI. Derived from:  https://www.mdpi.com/2306-5710/2/2/13/htm

[9] Elderberry: A Natural Way to Boost Immunity During Cold and Flu Season? Health Essentials. Derived from: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/elderberry-a-natural-way-to-boost-immunity-during-cold-and-flu-season/

[10] The Health Benefits of Olive Leaf Extract. Wong, Cathy and Fogoros, Richard MD. Very Well Health. Derived from: https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-benefits-of-olive-leaf-extract-89489

[11] 3 Vitamins That Are Best for Boosting Your Immunity. Cleveland Clinic. Derived from: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/3-vitamins-best-boosting-immunity/

Doctor holding in hand Immune System

Immune System: An In-Depth Look into the Key Components

“Optimal functioning of the immune system, it turns out, is dependent upon feeling good.”           

Marcey Shapiro

Your immune system is your body’s natural defense against illness, and it also kicks in to lead charge over the healing process when you become injured. While we are born with many natural tools that support immune function, we can also strengthen it with tactics such as strategic lifestyle habits.

As the team which has pioneered the medical specialty of age management medicine, Cenegenics is committed to helping patients do everything they can to stay protected against serious illness. For this reason, we take a highly scientific approach to perfectly tuning the body at the cellular level, optimizing overall functioning, including the immune system. Find out more about how your immune system works below and what you can do to make it even stronger.

How Does the Immune System Work?


The core role of the immune system is to prevent against or control infections. It can differentiate among healthy cells and those that pose a threat with the ability to recognize danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These cells may be dangerous due to infection or other types of damage, such as cancer. Infections, including viruses, also release signals called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which the immune system recognizes as well.

At the first sign of these issues, the immune system responds to combat the illness or other damage-causing agents. If it can’t activate properly, issues like infection occur. Yet, issues also develop if the immune system is activated when it shouldn’t be, as seen in conditions such as autoimmune disorders and allergies. The immune system must therefore function optimally to maintain health. [1]

Key Components of the Immune System


The immune system is complex and far-reaching, encompassing many different cell types which each have a specific role. With that being said, every immune cell originates from precursors in bone marrow and ultimately develops into a mature cell through changes which take place throughout the body. Here are the key players in the body’s immunity:

  • Skin: The first barrier against harmful agents, skin cells create antimicrobial proteins. Each layer of skin has its own specific set of immune cells.
  • Bone marrow: Stem cells, the powerful cells which can give rise to various cell types, are found within the bone marrow. The common myeloid progenitor stem cell can transform into innate immune cells, which act as the first-line response system against infection. Common lymphoid progenitor stem cells, on the other hand, give rise to adaptive immune cells, including B cells and T cells, which create responses to microbes which the body has encountered in the past.
  • Bloodstream: Immune cells travel via the bloodstream, staying on the lookout for issues. Physicians use blood drawings to look for white blood cells (immune cells), which can provide insights into overall immune system health.
  • Thymus: A small, specialized organ located in the upper chest, the thymus is the maturation site for T cells.
  • Lymphatic system: A system through which tissues and the bloodstream communicate, the lymphatic system features lymphoid organs, vessels, and tissues. Immune cells flow through the lymphatic system to meet in the lymph nodes, which have multiple locations throughout the body. In this central hub, immune cells share information, such as the recognition of a microbe, which can trigger a response of activation and replication.
  • Spleen: The spleen enriches immune cells, and if pathogens are present in the blood, they will activate in this key organ, which is located behind the stomach.
  • Mucosal tissue: Mucosal tissue in areas such as the respiratory tract and intestines house specialized immune hubs. The gut, for example, is home to Peyer’s patches, where immune cells assess samples to look for pathogens. [2]

What Can Affect Your Immune System?


In certain individuals, the immune system doesn’t work properly due to an immune system disorder. There are several factors that can impact immune system functionality, including:

  • Primary immune deficiency: a person is born with a weakened immune system
  • Acquired immune deficiency: a person gets a disease that weakens the immune system, such as HIV or hepatitis C [3]
  • Allergic reaction: an individual’s immune system overreacts, as seen in food and seasonal allergies
  • Autoimmune disease: the immune system turns against someone, as seen in rheumatoid arthritis [4]

Under normal circumstances, the immune system responds to issues like injuries and illness through acute inflammation. The blood vessels dilate, resulting in redness and swelling, so that white blood cells can swarm the affected area and promote healing. The damaged tissue releases cytokines, or emergency signals, which recruit immune cells, hormones, and nutrients to address the issue. As healing takes place, the acute inflammation fades.

Yet, if inflammation lasts too long or occurs when it’s not needed, chronic inflammation ensues. Also known as persistent, low-grade inflammation, chronic inflammation may have long-term effects throughout the whole body. It results in a consistent, low levels of inflammation which are detected by increases in system markers in the blood. Systemic inflammation has been linked to heart disease, stroke, and autoimmune conditions such as lupus. [5]

Aside from medical issues that prevent the immune system from working as it should, there are several other factors that impact immune system functionality and potentially trigger chronic inflammation, such as:

  • Stress: Researchers suspect chronic stress, spurring from issues such as relationships and work, can take its toll on the immune system, potentially contributing to issues like heart disease over time.
  • Diet: Like other systems in your body, the immune system requires sound nutrition to function well. Experts have witnessed altered immune system responses in test subjects with micronutrient deficiencies, suggesting an important link between diet and immune system health. This link appears to be particularly strong in older adults. [6]
  • Sedentary lifestyle: Neglecting physical activity and sitting too much can impede your body’s ability to fight infection. Inactivity has been shown to impair the immune system and lead to inflammation and chronic illness. [7]
  • Alcohol: Excessive drinking can impair the immune system’s ability to respond to pathogens. A major metabolite of alcohol, acetaldehyde, appears to impact the lungs’ ciliary function, leaving individuals more susceptible to bacterial and viral infections. [8]
  • Nicotine: Smoking both traditional and e-cigarettes increases cortisol levels and restricts the formation and response of B and T cells. [9]

Fortunately, just as there are many lifestyle factors that can impede immunity, there are also ways you can adjust your habits to boost your immune system.

Strengthen Your Immune System


Futuristic immune system protection with glowing low polygonal shield, virus and bacteria cells.

While your body already has lines of defense in place to ward off illness, you can still strengthen the immune system with the following simple practices.

  • Get ample sleep. Lack of sleep interferes with the production of white blood cells, so aim for at least 7 hours per night. [10]
  • Eat a nutritious diet. Give your body the nutrients it needs by incorporating plenty of fruits and vegetables, lean protein, and healthy fats into your meals.
  • Perform moderate, regular exercise. Strenuous exercise practiced on an ongoing basis can exhaust the body, leaving it more susceptible to infection. [11] Instead, stick with consistent, moderate physical activity, which reduces your risk of catching viruses. [12]
  • Find healthy stress management practices. Develop relaxation techniques, such as taking a walk, meditating, or journaling, to alleviate cortisol-inducing stress. 
  • Practice good hygiene. One of the simplest but most effective ways to control germs is washing your hands frequently, including before meals. Avoid touching your face whenever possible.
  • Regularly disinfect household objects. Wipe down key surface areas such as doorknobs, countertops and tables, and remote controls.
  • Consider supplements. There are a number of key nutrients which support optimal immune system functionality, including C, D, and E, vitamins, among others. Introducing a nutraceutical regimen into your routine at the discretion of a trusted physician could help to strengthen your immune function.
  • Limit alcohol. If you drink, do so only in moderation.

Understanding the Importance of a Healthy Immune System - In Conclusion


Optimal immune function is critically important to keeping you protected against everything from the common cold to serious illness. Cenegenics patients have the unique advantages of working closely with their physician and clinical teams to improve biomarkers that influence immunity, including those related to chronic inflammation, insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular and pulmonary function, and more.

By improving these metrics, incorporating the lifestyle factors mentioned above, and utilizing nutraceuticals that include, but are not limited to, Vitamin D3, Vitamin E, Vitamin B6, zinc, and Vitamin C, Cenegenics strengthens patients’ immune function to prepare them for seasonal and other illnesses.

Within just 30 to 60 days on our program, patients begin to feel dramatically better. Their biological age is rebalanced to where it was in their 20s and 30s, and they become better equipped to fight off illness both now and into the future. In fact, so many people trust our ability to optimize their wellness that a quarter of our patient base is made up of doctors and their family members. One of our doctors has even written the textbook on age management which other physicians now study. See what all of our patients have to say about their experience with the program by visiting the Cenegenics reviews page, or call your nearest location to discuss our exclusive Elite Health Evaluation, Cenegenics cost, and benefits of the program.

Next Steps – Reinforce your Immune Health

FREE Consultation

Our world class physicians create a personalized plan to help you feel 10+ years younger. You'll be more energetic, lose weight, sleep better, have more libido, and think more clearly. Click below to schedule a free consultation with one of our physicians. It's quick + easy. 

About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba 
Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources: 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

References

[1] Overview of the Immune System. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Derived from: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/immune-system-overview

[2] See above. Derived from: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/immune-system-overview

[3] The Many Causes Of Immune Deficiency. German Society for Immunology. Derived from: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090914111540.htm

[4] Immune System Disorders. University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, NY. Derived from:  https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentID=123&ContentTypeID=134

[5] What Is Inflammation? Szalay, Jessie. LiveScience. Derived from: https://www.livescience.com/52344-inflammation.html

[6] How to boost your immune system. Harvard Medical School. Derived from: https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-to-boost-your-immune-system  

[7] Sedentary Behavior and Adiposity-Associated Inflammation The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. A. Allison, Matthew MD, MPH, Jensky, Nicole E. PhD, Marshall, Simon J., PhD, Bertoni, Alain G. , MD, MPH, and Cushman, Mary MD. National Institute of Medicine. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3244676/

[8] 9 Surprising Ways You’re Weakening Your Immune System. Dallas, Mary Elizabeth and Marcellin, Lindsey MD, MPH. Everyday Health. Derived from: https://www.everydayhealth.com/news/9-surprising-ways-youre-weakening-your-immune-system/

[9] See above. Derived from: https://www.everydayhealth.com/news/9-surprising-ways-youre-weakening-your-immune-system/

[10] Sleep deprivation effect on the immune system mirrors physical stress. National Sleep Foundation. Derived from: https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/sleep-deprivation-effect-immune-system-mirrors-physical-stress

[11] The immune system and overtraining in athletes: clinical implications. AC Hackney and Koltun KJ. National Institute of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23540172

[12] Evaluation of immune response after moderate and overtraining exercise in wistar rat. Zahra Gholamnezhad, Abolfazl Khajavi Rad, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady, Mahmoud Hosseini, and Mojtaba Sankian. National Institutes of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3938879/    

red-haired middle aged woman smiling into camera

Menopause: Symptoms, Complications, and What You Can Do

They say that age is all in your mind.  The trick is keeping it from creeping down into your body.

Anonymous

Hot flashes, insomnia, and mood changes: chances are, if you’re a woman in her 40s or 50s, you’ve recognized these symptoms as the telltale signs of menopause. Of course, there are many other, seldom talked-about symptoms which can also disrupt your routine, from diminishing libido to cognitive changes and a decline in mental acuity. All of these factors can significantly impact your quality of life. Unfortunately, in many cases, women simply push through and deal with the discomfort.

With Cenegenics, that doesn’t have to be the case. We’re the pioneers behind the medical specialty of age management; in fact, one of our physicians even wrote the book on it, which other doctors use to study optimal health through aging. We’re therefore exceptionally well-versed in the aging processes — including menopause. Fortunately, this also means we know how to control its frustrating symptoms. Discover more about what menopause is and the symptoms it causes below.

What Is Menopause?


Menopause is the natural end to a woman’s menstrual cycles. By medical standards, a woman is considered to have “hit menopause” once she’s gone 12 months without any periods. Yet, there can be months or even years leading up to this timeframe (called perimenopause), during which you experience a litany of uncomfortable symptoms. The average age for menopause in the U.S. is 52, but it can occur any time during a woman’s 40s or 50s. [1]

Menopause occurs as a result of the natural decrease of reproductive hormones by the ovaries. In specific, estrogen and progesterone production declines, resulting in a loss of fertility and variations in menstrual periods. Undergoing a hysterectomy can also prompt menopause, especially if the ovaries are removed in addition to the uterus (considered a total hysterectomy). In such cases, the symptoms of menopause may be severe, as hormonal changes are brought on abruptly instead of over the course of years. [2]

In a way, the frustrating part about menopause is that it isn’t considered a disease or disorder; rather, it’s a natural process. Yet, its symptoms can feel very much like that of a chronic disease, stretching on for seven to 14 years. [3] In our opinion, that’s far too long to live uncomfortably — especially with the body-wide symptoms that can accompany menopause, described below.

The Symptoms of Menopause


Menopause can impact women and their heath including mental, physical, and emotional levels, leading to symptoms such as:

  • Irregular menstruation
  • Vaginal dryness and discomfort
  • Hot flashes
  • Diminished sex drive
  • Weight gain, especially in the abdominal area
  • Sleep disturbances, including insomnia
  • Racing heart
  • Increased urination
  • Breast tenderness or soreness
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Cognitive challenges, including difficulty with memory or concentration
  • Changes in hair color, volume, and texture
  • Hot flashes
  • Dry skin
  • Joint stiffness and pain [4]

What Are Potential Complications of Menopause?


In addition to the symptoms described above, there are some potential complications associated with menopause. Following the cessation of menstrual periods, a woman’s risk for some medical conditions increases, including:

  • Osteoporosis: Women’s bones tend to be thinner and smaller than men’s. During the onset of menopause, the decrease in estrogen levels can lead to bone loss, as the hormone protects bone tissue. Roughly one in two women over 50 will experience a fracture due to osteoporosis, and an estimated 80% of the people who experience the condition are women. [5]
  • Cardiovascular disease: Decreases in estrogen levels is also linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in both women and men. [6] Estrogen is believed to aid in blood vessel flexibility, allowing them to support proper blood flow. When production of this important hormone drops, the risk of heart attacks goes up. [7]

    While hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may not be prescribed for women specifically for improving cardiovascular health, it is a powerful benefit of treatment. Research published in the BMJ indicates a significant reduction in heart failure, myocardial infarction, and overall mortality following HRT after menopause. [8]
  • Urinary incontinence: With the decrease in key reproductive hormones also comes the loss of elasticity in the pelvic floor. The tissue in the vagina and urethra may weaken, leading to urinary incontinence and increased urinary tract infections. Pelvic floor exercises may reduce some of these symptoms; or, HRT may help alleviate the vaginal changes tied to incontinence. [9]

Quality of Life During and After Menopause – In Conclusion


middle aged woman jogging and smiling into distance

The long list of symptoms and potential complications above only provides a glimpse of what menopause is really like. For anyone who’s living it, the discomfort can become difficult to bear. While menopause is a natural process, you shouldn’t have to live with the discomfort of its symptoms.

Cenegenics is here to help. We specialize in the health, wellness, and hormone imbalances and help your body reverse its biological clock to rebalance your levels and restore the energy, cognitive function, and physical wellbeing you had in your 20s or 30s.

We take a highly scientific approach to get your body perfectly tuned at a cellular level, taking into consideration your unique needs based on specific biomarkers and making tailored recommendations to promote ideal function. Some aspects of our program include lifestyle factors such as nutrition and exercise, as well as prescriptions for nutraceuticals or HRT when clinically indicated.

Browse through our Cenegenics reviews and you’ll quickly see that we have a proven track record of helping patients navigate the changes that come with age. In fact, we’re the “doctor’s doctor,” trusted by the physicians and their families who make up a quarter of our patient base. Most patients feel better within 30 to 60 days of starting our program.

If you’re ready to see how we can improve your life during and after menopause, don’t hesitate to contact us for more information about Cenegenics cost and the included Elite Health evaluation, or with any other questions you may have about getting started.

Next Steps - Don’t Suffer Needlessly from the Symptoms
of Menopause

FREE Consultation

Our world class physicians create a personalized plan to help you feel 10+ years younger. You'll be more energetic, lose weight, sleep better, have more libido, and think more clearly. Click below to schedule a free consultation with one of our physicians. It's quick + easy. 

About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba 
Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources: 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

References

[1] Menopause. Mayo Clinic. Derived from: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menopause/symptoms-causes/syc-20353397?page=0&citems=10

[2] See above.

[3] What Is Menopause? National Institute of Aging. Derived from: https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-menopause

[4] Complications. Derived from: https://www.healthline.com/health/menopause#complications

[5] What Women Need to Know. National Osteoporosis Foundation. Derived from: https://www.nof.org/preventing-fractures/general-facts/what-women-need-to-know/

[6] See above.   

[7] Menopause and Heart Disease. Derived from: https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/consumer-healthcare/what-is-cardiovascular-disease/menopause-and-heart-disease

[8] Effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular events in recently postmenopausal women: randomised trial. Derived from: https://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e6409

[9] See above.

Middle aged couple dressed casually walking away from a private plane and smiling

Take Control of Your Biological Age with Cenegenics

Life is about growing old and feeling young.

Anushka Singh

While chronological age counts the number of years you’ve been alive, biological age tells a more comprehensive story about your health. It assesses specific physiological measures to establish an individual’s wellness relative to their chronological age. For example, a healthy individual in their 40s may have a lower biological age than someone of poorer health in their 30s, despite having a higher chronological age. In other words, biological age tells us how well our bodies are functioning – and how likely we are to develop age-related conditions – based on key biomarkers.

Researchers have looked at many factors when attempting to come up with a widely-accepted measurement for biological age. Some believe that it should be measured based on molecular markers of inflammation, including C-reactive protein. [1] Others feel biological age encompasses mortality, the ability to function, and the need for therapies and interventions to extend health (or lack thereof). [2] Others still feel that biological age is marked by bodily changes which take place, including persistent, low-grade inflammation despite a lack of any known pathogens, dysfunction at the cellular level, stem cells’ impeded ability to repair tissue, and cells’ decreasing ability to proliferate. [3]

Science-Based Biological Age Management


Most recently, Yale School of Medicine researcher, Morgan Levine, PhD, and her team have come up with nine biomarkers which appear to have the greatest impact on lifespan, including:

  • blood sugar levels
  • immune and inflammatory measures
  • kidney and liver measures

When plugged into an advanced algorithm, these metrics yield a biological age reading which acts as a “highly robust predictor of both morbidity and mortality outcomes.” It does more than just tell you the rate at which you’re aging, however; it can also determine the therapies and lifestyle interventions that can be introduced now to lower your risk for serious diseases such as cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. As a result, understanding your biological age can pave the way for not only a longer lifespan, but also an extension of the health span, which translates to an improved quality of life at every age. [4]

As leaders in age management, Cenegenics has closely looked at biological aging for the past 23 years. One of our physicians has authored the textbook used to teach physicians Age Management; in fact, we pioneered the concept as a medical specialty. We therefore firmly support Yale Medical School’s standpoint that there’s plenty you can do to take control of your biological age. Here are just a few ways we can help you reduce the rate at which you’re aging.

Maintain a Healthy Weight


Many experts agree that chronic inflammation is a characteristic of a higher biological age. In people who are obese, fat tissue acts as an active endocrine organ, contributing to the production of TNF-alpha proteins, a biomarker of low-grade, systemic inflammation. This inflammation appears to explain the link between obesity and many co-morbidities, including:

Fortunately, Cenegenics helps patients lose weight if needed and maintain a healthy weight over the long term. We analyze specific biomarkers and perform in-depth body composition analyses, understanding that health is about more than just one number. We then provide tailored recommendations to help our patients control their weight. With this highly scientific approach to work toward getting your body perfectly tuned at the cellular level, we prompt ideal function and thus improve biological age.

Improve Sleep Quality


Sleep deprivation, too, is linked to inflammation which could increase biological age. In studies, individuals whose sleep was restricted by 25 to 50% of a normal eight-hour cycle experienced inflammatory cytokines, which are directly linked to an elevated risk for metabolic syndrome. [6] The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases with chronological age, but it’s also linked to increased biological age as well. It bears a strong link with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. [7]

Promoting quality sleep is one of the pillars of the Cenegenics program. We believe that sleep is important at every age, and supports not only optimal physical health, but also strong brain function and emotional wellness.

Sleep deprivation can affect the body’s insulin response, increase the risk of obesity, and impede immune system functionality. [8] This is critical, considering the fact that some experts believe immune system changes have a direct role in the pace of biological aging. [9] Fortunately, the Cenegenics team helps patients develop targeted sleep management strategies to improve both the duration and quality of their slumber.

Tailor to Unique Biomarkers


To some degree, genetics are also believed to play a role in the rate of biological aging. After all, some people are naturally predisposed to certain conditions based on hereditary factors. While we can’t change our genetic profile, we can arm ourselves with as much knowledge as possible about genetic factors and make strategic choices to support the best possible outcomes with these factors in mind.

For instance, Cenegenics offers genetic testing options which can assess for everything from Alzheimer’s risk to food sensitivities. Our clinicians can then prescribe lifestyle modifications that can help to control your risk of developing serious conditions and give you the power to take a comprehensive, preventive approach against disease. 

Maintaining Healthy Hormone Levels


Hormone health is also related to biological age. At Cenegenics, we employ strategies to help patients achieve optimal hormone levels, reversing the biological age by rebalancing the body to where it was in their 20s and 30s. While the aging process is complex and still being studied, we know that many of the changes that take place in the body are influenced by declining hormone levels.

Fortunately, minimizing the risk of disease, frailty, and disability is possible through healthy lifestyle practices that promote hormone optimization, including:

  • stress management
  • regular physical activity
  • nutritious dietary choices
  • effective sleep practices

When clinically indicated, our physicians can also recommend hormone replacement therapy options to pursue hormone balance and improved overall health in specific populations.

Let Cenegenics Reverse Your Biological Age - In Conclusion


middle aged man in very good shape running out of the ocean

It isn’t a coincidence that these very factors are the pillars of the Cenegenics program. Not only do our experts take a research-based approach to help our patients reach and maintain a healthy weight, improve their sleep quality, and optimize their health in many other important ways, but we also look at each individual’s biomarkers for a better understanding of their biological age. In doing so, we tailor recommendations to your precise needs, allowing you to feel your best both now and at every age. 

Although it’s impossible to turn back the chronological clock, Cenegenics can give you the tools to take control of your biological age, and thus the future. By promoting improved health across a number of key areas, including sleep, diet, and lifestyle habits, our clinicians help patients make wiser, future-focused health decisions that help them feel better both now and years down the road.

All of this is included in the Cenegenics cost of program membership, along with the many other benefits that come with being one of our patients. But don’t take our word for it – see what other satisfied patients have to say on our Cenegenics reviews page. As you’ll see, most patients begin to feel dramatically better within 30 to 60 days on the program. We’re also the doctors who other doctors trust, with physicians and their families making up 25% of our patient population. Once you’re ready to start taking control of your biological age, contact your nearest location for more information.

Next Steps - Why Wait to Turn Back the Hands of Your Biological Clock

FREE Consultation

Our world class physicians create a personalized plan to help you feel 10+ years younger. You'll be more energetic, lose weight, sleep better, have more libido, and think more clearly. Click below to schedule a free consultation with one of our physicians. It's quick + easy. 

About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba 
Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources: 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

References

[1] Overview of the Immune System. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Derived from: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/immune-system-overview

[2] See above. Derived from: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/immune-system-overview

[3] The Many Causes Of Immune Deficiency. German Society for Immunology. Derived from: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090914111540.htm

[4] Immune System Disorders. University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, NY. Derived from:  https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentID=123&ContentTypeID=134

[5] What Is Inflammation? Szalay, Jessie. LiveScience. Derived from: https://www.livescience.com/52344-inflammation.html

[6] How to boost your immune system. Harvard Medical School. Derived from: https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-to-boost-your-immune-system  

[7] Sedentary Behavior and Adiposity-Associated Inflammation The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. A. Allison, Matthew MD, MPH, Jensky, Nicole E. PhD, Marshall, Simon J., PhD, Bertoni, Alain G. , MD, MPH, and Cushman, Mary MD. National Institute of Medicine. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3244676/

[8] 9 Surprising Ways You’re Weakening Your Immune System. Dallas, Mary Elizabeth and Marcellin, Lindsey MD, MPH. Everyday Health. Derived from: https://www.everydayhealth.com/news/9-surprising-ways-youre-weakening-your-immune-system/

[9] See above. Derived from: https://www.everydayhealth.com/news/9-surprising-ways-youre-weakening-your-immune-system/

[10] Sleep deprivation effect on the immune system mirrors physical stress. National Sleep Foundation. Derived from: https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/sleep-deprivation-effect-immune-system-mirrors-physical-stress

[11] The immune system and overtraining in athletes: clinical implications. AC Hackney and Koltun KJ. National Institute of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23540172

[12] Evaluation of immune response after moderate and overtraining exercise in wistar rat. Zahra Gholamnezhad, Abolfazl Khajavi Rad, Mohammad Hossein Boskabady, Mahmoud Hosseini, and Mojtaba Sankian. National Institutes of Health. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3938879/    

businessman looking out window at city skyline

Age Calculator: Is Your Biological and Chronological Age the Same?”

“Let us never know what old age is.  Let us know the happiness time brings, not count the years”

Ausonius

At the simplest level, aging is the process of becoming older. For most people, age itself is an uncomplicated matter: it’s the number we see on our birthday cakes – the difference between the current year and the year of our birth. Yet, from a scientific standpoint, age is far more than just a number. It’s also defined as the progressive deterioration of a living thing, in which the risk of mortality increases exponentially. [1]

This definition may seem a bit morbid, but now, experts are exploring new ways to look at aging. We know, for example, that one 65-year-old may not be as healthy as the next, just as 40-, 50-, and even 25-year-olds can have varying degrees of health. To get a better understanding of how health differences can be so vast among individuals of the same chronological age, experts are looking at biological age instead.

Science Supports Biological Age Management!


In particular, Yale Medical School researcher, Morgan Levine, PhD, recently published findings on the matter, in which they developed an equation to combine an individual’s blood measures with advanced algorithms. Called DNAm PhenoAge, this process yields a biological age reading which they call “a new epigenetic biomarker of aging.” The test reveals predictions for age-related outcomes, such as all-cause mortality, physical functioning, cancers, and Alzheimer’s disease, determining age at a cellular level. [2]

Because not everyone of the same age faces the same risk for these conditions, evaluating risk on a more individualized basis can provide a telling account of where you stand in terms of both current and future health.

As pioneers in age management, Cenegenics has remained at the forefront of closely studying biological aging factors and helping our patients reduce this critical measure for 23 years. In fact, we pioneered the medical specialty of Age Management, and one of our physicians even wrote the textbook used to teach other doctors the key theories behind optimal health through aging. We therefore support Yale Medical School research in their findings and believe that biological aging is one of the most important factors for individuals to understand and address. Here, we discuss the principles behind biological age and why they’re essential for telling the true story of our health, no matter what our birth certificates say. 

What Is Biological Age?


Biological age combines specific physiological measures to determine a person’s status of health relative to individuals of a certain chronological age. For instance, if a person is 30 years old chronologically but their biomarkers bear a closer resemblance to those of the average 40-year-old, it would indicate that the individual is aging at a quicker rate than the norm. [3] Biological age therefore looks at the pace at which we’re aging, and ultimately determines our current levels of health while helping to predict our lifespan.

While most experts agree that measuring biological age has its benefits, there have been challenges in terms of reaching an agreement on which factors to look at when assessing it. For example:

  • Some researchers define biological age as a marker of “aging, stress, and frailty,” in which factors like molecular markers of inflammation (including C-reactive protein), sleeping difficulties, and smoking are analyzed.[4]
  • Others state that the three aspects of aging should encompass survival or mortality, one’s ability to function, and the need for therapies or interventions to extend one’s health span. [5]
  • Others still claim that biological aging includes four key bodily changes:
  • Persistent, low-grade inflammation which occurs without any known pathogens
  • Dysfunction at the cellular level, including DNA damage, dysfunctional telomeres, and protein aggregation
  • Stem cell changes which impede the ability to repair or replace tissue
  • Cellular senescence, in which cells’ ability to proliferate and certain metabolic activities are altered. [6]

Clearly, finding a single measurement for biological age is much more complex than simply counting years, as we do for chronological age. Researchers have posited that, regardless of which factors are used to measure biological age, to be considered viable, they should:

  • Produce measurements which are realistic and are within the limits of a recorded lifespan
  • Be able to identify individuals who are at risk before they contract a disease
  • Predict age-associated biological and functional outcomes more effectively than chronological age
  • Predict remaining longevity and mortality in populations of which 90% of individuals are still alive. [7]

Most recently, Yale Medical School’s publication has emerged as perhaps the most comprehensive and well-researched approach to biological aging. The research drew on data from 10,000 participants in a study which ran from 1988 to 1994 in which they sought to identify the key metrics that could forecast life expectancy most accurately. Based on those findings, they created a subsequent study of 11,000 people, which ran from 1999 to 2010. After looking at 42 different clinical measures, they ultimately pinpointed nine biomarkers with the greatest influence on lifespan, including inflammatory, immune, blood sugar, kidney, and liver measures. [8]

Obviously, biological age is an area of interest which draws many researchers across various disciplines. But the question remains: Why is biological age such a hot topic?

What Is Chronological Age? 


Chronological age is the number of years for which you’ve been alive. It’s a straightforward calculation which has been the gold standard for estimating the risk of certain ailments and conditions in individuals. For example, the risk for chronic and neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular disease, and most types of cancer increases with chronological age. Increasing chronological age also corresponds with increased risk of geriatric syndromes, such as immobility, frailty, and diminishing physical resilience. [9]

Yet, while we know that disease risk increases with chronological age, and that physical and mental function declines with it, the rate at which these changes take place can differ significantly from one person to the next. This is because numerous factors make up the aging process, and can be impacted by influences such as lifestyle, the environment, and genetics. To measure the rate at which aging takes place for a more concrete idea of where a person is on the trajectory of aging (versus simply how many years they’ve been alive), experts have developed biological age.

Why Is Biological Age So Important?


Understanding the breakdown of biological ages within a certain population can give us some information about the group’s future. For instance, an aging population will most likely require increased health care support. Yet, chronological age only tells us one piece of the story. With a look in to biological age, we can better understand the pace of aging to determine whether we’re becoming healthier as a population, or if our choices are actually aging us at a faster rate.

For instance, while fewer people in the U.S. are smoking now than in the 1980s, obesity rates have more than doubled within the same time frame. [10] No matter how you choose to measure it, factors like obesity and smoking are sure to have an effect on biological age, as both have body-wide implications.

In fact, one of the main reasons studying biological age is so important is because there’s a good chance many factors that impact it are within our control to change. While we can’t change our genetic factors, for instance, lead Yale researcher Morgan Levine explains that the newest equation for biological age can give patients a concrete idea of what they can do to reduce their risk for disease and “show you how you can reduce your risk because you can plug all the numbers in to see how the risk drops if they bring their glucose down, for example.” [11]

Similarly, telomeres, the end of chromosomes which aid in the regulation of cellular aging, can be affected by habits and factors such as:

  • Stress
  • Exercise
  • Diet, and
  • Sleep patterns[12]

Moreover, traditional medicine often comes up short in terms of accurately predicting serious disease risk in populations with no prior signs of disease. This isn’t the fault of medical practitioners; after all, treating issues after they emerge has been a standard in medical care for decades. Yet, blood pressure and similar readings aren’t always enough to determine who could be at risk for heart disease in groups who are presumably healthy. Detecting biological age is therefore more than just a way to determine who’s aging quickly and who isn’t; it’s also a powerful means of determining who is at risk for diseases which may have otherwise gone undetected. Yale’s study is the first to determine that biomarkers of biological aging are “highly predictive of cardiovascular and coronary heart disease,” for instance. With these findings, interventions such as lifestyle changes can be introduced long before disease actually develops. [13]

What Can Be Done to Control Biological Age?


With the help of Cenegenics, it’s entirely possible to start reversing your biological clock now. While the aging process is complex and still being studied, we know that minimizing the risk of disease, frailty, and disability can be achieved through healthy lifestyle practices, including:

It isn’t a coincidence that these very factors are the pillars of the Cenegenics program. Not only do our experts take a research-based approach to help our patients reach and maintain a healthy weight, improve their sleep quality, and optimize their health in many other important ways, but we also look at each individual’s biomarkers for a better understanding of their biological age. We take a highly scientific approach to work toward getting a body perfectly tuned at the cellular level so that it functions ideally, thereby reversing your biological age and rebalancing your body to where it was in your 20s or 30s. We tailor recommendations to your precise needs, allowing you to feel your best both now and at every age. 

You Can Feel Younger Than You Think - In Conclusion


Man on sailboat

As you can see, there’s more to think about when it comes to age than your chronological age alone. Understanding where you fall on the trajectory of aging allows you to make the choices that can preserve optimal health no matter what your chronological age may be, and in some cases, may even allow you to slow or reverse the aging process. In doing so, you can minimize your risk for disease, stave off geriatric conditions such as frailty and diminished physical resilience, and enjoy a richer quality of life.

Yet, to achieve these goals, you need the help of experts who not only understand but actually specialize in age management. Read through Cenegenics reviews and you’ll discover stories about how we’ve helped countless patients feel years younger. In fact, our patients feel dramatically better within 30 to 60 days on the program. That’s because we’re giving them the tools and guidance they need to improve their health at a cellular level, thereby prompting better wellness now and into the future. We’re even the physicians most trusted by other medical providers; we’re considered the “doctor’s doctor,” as 25% of our patient base is made up of doctors and their family members. So, whether you have questions about Cenegenics’ cost, are wondering what our exclusive Elite Health Evaluations include, or you’re simply ready to find out how our team can help you slow or reverse your biological clock, don’t hesitate to contact your nearest Cenegenics location for more information.

Next Steps – Turn Back the Hands of Time Now

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About the Contributor

Rudy Inaba 
Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise

Rudy Inaba is Cenegenics’ Global Director of Nutrition & Exercise. He is a recognized fitness and sports nutrition consultant with nearly 15 years of experience in clinical exercise physiology and lifestyle management. After pursuing his Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Rudy joined Cenegenics where he leads 20 clinical locations nationwide in their advancements in kinesiology, nutritional biochemistry, and their analyses of industry research & market trending.

Key Resources

This guide was produced with contributions from the following key resources: 

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 1: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

The Cenegenics Education and Research Foundation  

The Textbook of Age Management Medicine Volume 2: Mastering Healthy Aging Nutrition, Exercise and Hormone Replacement Therapy

Click to purchase

Textbook Authors:

Jeffrey Park Leake, M.D., CPT

Dr. Jeffrey Park Leake is a Partner and Director of Education at Cenegenics Elite Health specializing in age management and wellness. Having trained hundreds of physicians worldwide, Dr. Leake is also the Director of Education for the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging course at AMM Educational Foundation.

Todd David Greenberg, M.D., CSCS

Dr. Todd Greenberg is a practicing physician with a broad range of expertise, including wellness, exercise, sports injuries, and MRI of sports injuries. He is a Radiology Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington.

References

[1] Michael D. West, et al. “Toward a unified theory of aging and regeneration.” Regenerative Medicine. 28 Aug. 2019.

[2] US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, “An epigenetic biomarker of aging of lifespan and helathspan.  Derived from:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5940111/

[3] Levine, Morgan E. and Crimmins, Eileen M. “Is 60 the New 50? Examining Changes in Biological Age Over the Past Two Decades.” Demography. 1 April 2019.

[4] Pyrkov, Timothy V. and Fedichev, Peter O. “Biological age is a universal marker of aging, stress, and frailty.” Biomarkers of aging. March 2019.

[5] Jazwinski, S. Michal and Kim, Sangkyu. “Examination of the Dimensions of Biological Age.” Frontiers in Genetics. 26 March 2019

[6] Tchkonia, Tamara, PhD, and Kirkland, James L., MD, PhD; see above.

[7] Levine, Morgan E. and Crimmins, Eileen M; see above.

[8] See above. Derived from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5940111/

[9] Tchkonia, Tamara, PhD, and Kirkland, James L., MD, PhD. “Aging, Cell Senescence, and Chronic Disease.” JAMA. 2 Oct. 2018.

[10] Levine, Morgan E. and Crimmins, Eileen M; see above.

[11] Sample, Ian. “Is the end nigh? New blood tests can reveal your life expectancy.” The Guardian. 9 Jul 2018. 

[12] Sifferlin, Alexandra. “3 Simple Lifestyle Habits That May Slow Aging.” Time. 29 July 2014.

[13] See above. Derived from:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5940111/

[14] Michael D. West, et al; see above.

[15] Fan, Shelly. “The First Evidence That Drugs Could Turn Back the Clock on Our Biological Age.” SingularityHub. 17 Sept. 2019.

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